Podcast/Archive

“Juror No 2”, as Lindy Lou Isonhood was known, talks about the impact that a death sentence had on her and other jurors in a case in Mississippi in which they reached a verdict to sentence Bobby Wilcher to death for the murder of a woman. Bobby had been convicted by another jury, but his original death sentence was set aside by an appeals court. Bobby was then sentenced to death a second time after a new sentencing trial. Lindy had reservations about the sentence and set out to find the other jurors nearly twenty-two years later to see if they had similar thoughts of regret. Lindy visited Bobby while he was on death row. He was executed and that event sparked a crusade by Lindy to reform the system. Lindy felt trapped by the jury instructions given by the Judge, making her feel like she had no choice. Lindy’s story is captured in a film, “Lindy Lou, Juror No. 2” which is currently being screened in some film festivals. Lindy is interviewed by host Craig Lubow in the second of two parts. Other films and news stories have looked at the impact of the death penalty on the defendants’ families, the victims’ families, and on the Warden and doctors that must implement the death penalty. This is the first time that the impact on the jurors is examined.


On this very special Thanksgiving edition of Arts Magazine, host Michael Hogge welcomes members of the Heartland Men’s Chorus to the KKFI studios for a chat about their upcoming Holiday Concert, and future concerts. Later, actor Kip Niven will talk about the upcoming performances of the Equity Actors Readers Theatre (E.A.R.T.H.). Get your lunch on and check out the great stuff happening in our city this holiday season!


Law and Disorder Editorials:

FDA Approves Digital Pill by Heidi Boghosian

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Release Aging People in Prison Campaign

The number of persons 50 years and older in New York State has risen more than 98% since 2000; it now exceeds 10,000″nearly 20% of the total incarcerated population. This reflects a national crisis in the prison system and the extension of a culture of revenge and punishment into all areas of our society.

The organization Release Aging People in Prison, or RAPP, works to end mass incarceration and promote racial justice by getting elderly and infirm people out of prison.

Led by Mujahid Farid, a 2013 Soros Justice Fellow who was incarcerated for 33 years in New York before his release in 2011, RAPP focuses on aging people in prison, many of whom are long-termers convicted of serious crimes. Many of these human beings have transformed their lives and developed skills and abilities they lacked before incarceration. They could be released from prison with little or no threat to public safety. Yet many are denied release, often for political reasons, and they needlessly remain imprisoned into old age. These elders could return to their communities if current mechanisms such as parole and compassionate release were correctly utilized. We also support legislation in New York to correct the parole system and increase the number of releases.

Guest ” Mujahid Farid co-founded the Prisoners AIDS Counseling and Education program and helped design prison-based sociology and theology courses that allowed others to earn college-credited in prison. He also earned four college degrees and other certifications while incarcerated, including his paralegal certificate, NYS Department of Labor Certificate in Human Development Counseling, and NYC Department of Health Certificate in HIV/AIDS Counseling.

Guest – David George, Associate Director of RAPP. In the last few years Dave has organized with and on behalf of currently and formerly incarcerated people, including at the Osborne Association and Correctional Association of New York.

RAPP Website – http://rappcampaign.com/

RAPP, c/o Correctional Assoc. of NY, 22 Cortlandt Street, 33rd Fl., New York, NY 10007
(646) 793-9082 X 1014
[email protected]

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Perpetual Line Up: Unregulated Police Face Recognition In America

The presence of surveillance cameras across the United States has enabled targeted facial recognition surveillance at essentially any place and any time. Each day law enforcement puts in place more and more cameras, including CCTV cameras, police body cameras, and cameras on drones and other aircraft. The FBIs Next Generation Biometric Identification Database and its facial recognition unit, FACE Services, can search for and identify nearly 64 million Americans, either from its own databases or through access to state DMV databases of driving license photos.

Its likely that government agencies will soon be able to pinpoint your location and even with whom youve been, just by typing your name into a computer.

The release of Apples IPhone X has drawn scrutiny to this technology. Despite civil liberties and privacy concerns, there are few limits on facial recognition technology. In March 2017 Congress held a hearing to discuss the risks of facial recognition surveillance. There is concern that facial recognition can be used to get around existing legal protections against location tracking, opening the door to unprecedented government monitoring an logging of personal associations, including protected First Amendment-related activities. Knowledge of individuals political, religious and associational activities could lead the way to bias, persecution and abuse.

As with many technological advances, there are benefits, too. Facial recognition can assist in locating missing persons or for other public safety purposes.

Guest – Clare Garvie, Clare is a Law Fellow at the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy and Technology. Her research with the Center is on face recognition use by law enforcement and the disparate impact of payday lending on vulnerable communities. She worked on the Centers 2016 report on facial recognition technology.


Victimized By Two Men And The Justice System As Well

Christy DiMaggio is a strong woman that is fighting for custody of her child, a child that the courts awarded to his father, a drug user, who beat Christy and numerous other women in the past. Christ DiMaggio was not always the strong woman she is today and that led her to trust an unethical lawyer who took advantage of her. Christy Dimaggio used to be naive about the Justice System and the “good old boy network” that gave her and her son a Judge, an unethical Lawyer and a Guardian Ad Litem that destroyed her life and very nearly her mental health. Christy Dimaggio is not perfect and has made some bad decisions, but she did nothing that broke the law or endangered her son.

Today Host Elisa Brietenbach talks with Christy DiMaggio in the second of three interviews in which she will talk about the lawyer that took advantage of her when she was at her most vulnerable and address the multitude of ways the legal system has worked to destroy her credibility, her mental health and give her son to her abuser. This is a story that has been covered in detail in The Pitch and now you get to hear Christy’s cautionary tale directly from her.

Rose Brooks Center For Battered Women
Rose Brooks logo-1
The Mission of Rose Brooks Center is to break the cycle of domestic violence so that individuals and families can live free of abuse.
Rose Brooks Center is about saving lives. Not just protecting the hundreds of individuals, families, and pets who need our emergency shelter to escape immediate danger, but the thousands of families who dream of a life safe from violence – a complete life built on respect, love, and compassion. Rose Brooks Center is the leader in innovative domestic violence programs and support. We believe the destructive cycle of abuse can only be broken by offering a full continuum of care including prevention programming, crisis intervention, life skills development, and other supportive and therapeutic services.

Host Teresa Wilke will speak with Scott Mason, Director of Donor Stewardship & Marketing for the Rose Brooks Center about their mission, programs and how the public can help them protect abused women and children.

Rose Brooks Center – 24-hour crisis hotline, 816-861-6100

P.O. Box 320599
Kansas City, MO 64132

Website – https://www.rosebrooks.org/

Scott Mason, Director of Donor Stewardship & Marketing
[email protected]
Direct 816-605-7113


Join us today for Every Woman where we have Alicia Casano Weisenbach from the Willow Domestic Violence Shelter as a guest today.

3pm on 90.1FM KKFI, streaming on kkfi.org and through lots of apps on your phone!

Every Woman: Domestic Violence
Episode date : October 21, 2017
On Every Woman
Play

Join us today to discuss the feminist news of the month for October 2017!


Join us this Thanksgiving evening! This month’s “River City Chautauqua” focuses on the fate of the American Dream in the 21st century. Guest Vi Tran discusses his experience as a Vietnamese immigrant and tells us a bit about his family background and his new play, “The Butcher’s Son”. Local musicians Brett Hodges will be singing a couple of songs and Betse Ellis and Clarke Wyatt have recorded an improvisational suite entitled “American Dream Suite”. Professors Bill Black and Akis Kalaitzidis will discuss the American Dream today and producer and co-host Julie Bennett Hume will discuss Robert D. Putnam’s ” Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis.”


Wednesday November 22, 2017
Host/producer Maria Vasquez Boyd asks the question; Where Were You The Day Kennedy Was Shot? Our contributors, Annette Billings, Judy Ancel, Suzanne Gladney, & Hugh Merrill respond with their account on that tragic day on November 22 1963.

A light rain was falling on Friday morning, November 22, but a crowd of several thousand stood in the parking lot outside the Texas Hotel where the Kennedys had spent the night. A platform was set up and the president, wearing no protection against the weather, came out to make some brief remarks. “There are no faint hearts in Fort Worth,” he began, “and I appreciate your being here this morning. Mrs. Kennedy is organizing herself. It takes longer, but, of course, she looks better than we do when she does it.” He went on to talk about the nation’s need for being “second to none” in defense and in space, for continued growth in the economy and “the willingness of citizens of the United States to assume the burdens of leadership.” The warmth of the audience response was palpable as the president reached out to shake hands amidst a sea of smiling faces. Back inside the hotel the president spoke at a breakfast of the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce, focusing on military preparedness. “We are still the keystone in the arch of freedom,” he said. “We will continue to do…our duty, and the people of Texas will be in the lead.”

The presidential party left the hotel President and Mrs. Kennedy at Love Field, Dallas, Texasand went by motorcade to Carswell Air Force Base for the thirteen-minute flight to Dallas. Arriving at Love Field, President and Mrs. Kennedy disembarked and immediately walked toward a fence where a crowd of well-wishers had gathered, and they spent several minutes shaking hands.
The first lady received a bouquet of red roses, which she brought with her to the waiting limousine. Governor John Connally and his wife, Nellie, were already seated in the open convertible as the Kennedys entered and sat behind them. Since it was no longer raining, the plastic bubble top had been left off. Vice President and Mrs. Johnson occupied another car in the motorcade.
The procession left the airport and traveled along a ten-mile route that wound through downtown Dallas on the way to the Trade Mart where the President was scheduled to speak at a luncheon.

Crowds of excited people lined the streets and waved to the Kennedys. The car turned off Main Street at Dealey Plaza around 12:30 p.m. As it was passing the Texas School Book Depository, gunfire suddenly reverberated in the plaza. Bullets struck the president’s neck and head and he slumped over toward Mrs. Kennedy. The governor was also hit in the chest. The car sped off to Parkland Memorial Hospital just a few minutes away. But little could be done for the President. A Catholic priest was summoned to administer the last rites, and at 1:00 p.m. John F. Kennedy was pronounced dead. Though seriously wounded, Governor Connally would recover.

The president’s body was brought to Love Field and placed on Air Force One. Before the plane took off, a grim-faced Lyndon B. Johnson stood in the tight, crowded compartment and took the oath of office, administered by US District Court Judge Sarah Hughes. The brief ceremony took place at 2:38 p.m. Less than an hour earlier, police had arrested Lee Harvey Oswald, a recently hired employee at the Texas School Book Depository. He was being held for the assassination of President Kennedy and the fatal shooting, shortly afterward, of Patrolman J. D. Tippit on a Dallas street.

On Sunday morning, November 24, Oswald was scheduled to be transferred from police headquarters to the county jail. Viewers across America watching the live television coverage suddenly saw a man aim a pistol and fire at point blank range. The assailant was identified as Jack Ruby, a local nightclub owner. Oswald died two hours later at Parkland Hospital.


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KKFI Jazz Calendar for November 20 – November 26

November 20, 2017 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for November 20 – November 26
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November 15, 2017 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for November 13 – November 19
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November 9, 2017 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on JoJR Interviewed District Public Defender, Ruth Petsch About Why Public Defenders Are Refusing New Cases?
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