Podcast/Archive

KC native screenwriter Gillian Flynn might finally get the Oscar love that eluded her for “Gone Girl.” “Widows” is a fierce and gritty heist movie that is also a potent, beautifully acted social drama with powerhouse performances from Viola Davis and Daniel Kaluuya. It’s disturbing, realistic and easily one of the best movies of the year. If “Ocean’s 11” had had a social conscience, it would have been “Widows.”

 

The second in the Harry Potter prequel series is pretty much what you’d expect. “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” is a beautifully produced but rambling adventure with dark overtones. Johnny Depp returns as an evil wizard who gives Eddie Redmayne and the other good wizards a run for their money. The multiple plot threads aren’t woven together successfully, but there’s enough movie magic to please most fans.

 

Mark Wahlberg’s family comedy “Instant Family” is a pleasant surprise, based loosely on director Sean Anders’ own experiences. This story about foster parenting and adoption has more meat on its bones than most movies in this genre and manages to be a genuinely touching experience.

 

An outstanding cast and thoughtful execution make “Boy Erased” a winner. It tells the true story of a teenager, played by Lucas Hedges, who is sent to a gay conversion therapy camp. It makes a strong point without casting stones. Expect to see Oscar nominations for Hedges and Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe as his conflicted parents. Filmmaker Joel Edgerton might get some notice, too.

 

Also opening this week, Rosamund Pike stars in “A Private War,” a biopic about famed war correspondent Marie Colvin. “Monrovia, Indiana” is a new documentary from the master, Fredrick Wiseman. “Prospect” is a sci-fi entry about a teen girl and her dad going to an alien moon to strike it rich. “The Clovehitch Killer” is yet another serial killer flick.


If understatement is a virtue, then “Wildlife,” a film adaptation of Richard Ford’s 1990 novel, has virtue to spare. This drama about the dissolution of a marriage marks the directorial debut of actor Paul Dano (“There Will be Blood”), who wrote the screenplay with his partner, Zoe Kazan (“Ruby Sparks”). Jake Gyllenhaal (“Brokeback Mountain”), Carey Mulligan (“Mudbound”) and Ed Oxenbould (“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day”) play members of a family in crisis.

Take Two: “Wildlife” (PG-13)
Episode date : November 16, 2018
On Take Two
Play

democracynow.org

Stories

Climate Scientist Who Fled CA Wildfire: We’re Going to Keep Paying Price If We Ignore Climate Change

At least 44 people are dead and more than 200 remain missing as two massive wildfires, fueled by easterly winds and a historic drought, continue to rage in … Read More →

As Fires Devastate California, 350.org Calls for Transition to 100% Renewable Energy Economy

California’s Camp Fire has become the state’s deadliest fire on record, decimating the town of Paradise, killing 42 people and destroying 7,200 structures. The fires in … Read More →

“An Incredible Victory”: Opponents of Keystone XL Pipeline Praise Judicial Order Blocking Construction

On Thursday, a federal judge in Montana temporarily halted the construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada’s tar sands … Read More →

Gaza Is Already Unlivable: A Response to Israel’s Deadly Airstrikes Targeting TV Station & Homes

The death toll in Gaza has risen to at least six after Israel launched its heaviest airstrikes on the region since 2014, targeting scores of buildings, including the … Read More →

Acting AG Matt Whitaker Scrutinized over His Radical Judicial Beliefs & Past Dirty Work for GOP

Controversy is growing over President Trump’s selection of Matt Whitaker to serve as acting attorney general following the ousting of Jeff Sessions. The state of … Read More →

Headlines →

California’s Record-Breaking Wildfires Kill At Least 44 Across State
Arizona’s U.S. Senate Seat Flips Blue as Sinema Declares Victory
Trump Falsely Claims Voter Fraud in FL, Says Races Should Go to Republicans
Mississippi Senator Under Fire for “Public Hanging” Comment
Daily Beast: ICE Imprisoning Record High of 44,000 People
Audio of Khashoggi’s Murder May Implicate Saudi Crown Prince
Amnesty Int’l Withdraws Top Honor from Burmese Leader Aung San Suu Kyi
Gaza: Israeli Airstrikes Kill 6 Palestinians as Fighting Intensifies
DRC: Ebola Outbreak Worst in Country’s History, Kills Almost 200
NYT Investigation Accuses North Korea of Expanding Missile Program
Vatican Orders U.S. Bishops to Halt Vote on Stopping Child Sex Abuse
Roger Stone Associate Jerome Corsi Expects to Be Indicted by Mueller
In New Memoir, Michelle Obama Slams Trump’s Sexism and Bigotry
Amazon Selects Queens, NY and D.C. Suburb for Headquarters Expansion
Trump Blames Democrats as Stock Market Falls 600 Points
Legendary Comic Book Creator Stan Lee Dies at 95

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Episode date : November 13, 2018
On Democracy Now!
Play

Stories

A Century After End of WWI, Trump Snubs Peace Summit While Macron Warns of Growing Nationalism

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month—that’s when World War I ended in 1918, 100 years ago this weekend. On Sunday, world leaders gathered in Paris to … Read More →

Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, Jane Addams: Honoring Antiwar Resisters on the 100th Anniv. of WWI’s End

This weekend marked 100 years since the armistice that ended World War I. In a speech commemorating the anniversary, French President Emmanuel Macron … Read More →

A Century After WWI’s End, Adam Hochschild Cautions: “Think Long and Hard Before Starting a New War”

Between 1914 and 1918, about 10 million civilians perished in World War I, and almost 10 million soldiers were killed. Another 21 million were wounded. This … Read More →

On Veterans Day, Advocates Warn Against Pence & Trump-Led Attacks on VA Healthcare

On the federal observance of Veterans Day, we take a closer look at the issue of veterans’ healthcare. On Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence wrote an article for … Read More →

After Former Marine Kills 12 in Thousand Oaks, CA, a Discussion on Mental Health for Veterans

On November 7, 2018, a former marine opened fire at a country music bar in Thousand Oaks, California, killing 12 people, mostly college students. Police have … Read More →

Headlines →

Over 30 Killed and 200 Missing in California Wildfires
Gov. Brown Blames Climate Change for Fires as Trump Blames California
Thousand Oaks Evacuated for Wildfires Days After Deadly Mass Shooting
Florida Recounts Underway in Contested Senate and Governor Races
Senate Race in AZ Still Uncalled as CA District Flips to Democrats
MS Senate Candidates Head to Runoff as GOP Incumbent Under Fire for Racist Joke
FBI Probing “Scam Company” Where Acting AG Matt Whitaker Once Served
Trump Continues Attacks on Black Women Reporters
In Final Act as AG, Sessions Limits Police Abuse Consent Decrees
Trump Skips Paris Peace Forum During WWI Commemoration
Yemen: U.S.-Backed Assault Threatens Supplies to Millions Facing Famine
NYT: Saudi Intelligence Officials Discussed Iran Assassinations
Somalia: Al-Shabab Attack Kills 39 as U.S. Ramps Up Airstrikes
Gaza: Israeli Raid Kills Seven Palestinians
Gaza: Israel Allows Qatar to Pay Palestinians’ Back Salaries
Aetna Ordered to Pay Family of Cancer Patient Denied Treatment

Forward this email →

Donate

Monday, November 12, 2018
Episode date : November 12, 2018
On Democracy Now!
Play

This week on CounterSpin: There’s a lot to think about in terms of who “won” in the 2018 midterms, but there’s also a lot to think about in terms of how we locate electoral politics in our efforts to change the world. As Phyllis Bennis and Rev. William Barber wrote: “Elections are not how we change history. But they are a big part of how we — social movements, poor and disenfranchised and marginalized people, communities of color—engage with power.” So Tuesdays in November and what happens every other day of the year is our topic.

First we’ll hear from Negin Owliaei, inequality editor and researcher at the Institute for Policy Studies, about choices voters made about a range of ballot initiatives that can have major impact in their communities.

We also talk with civil rights attorney Liz OuYang, of the New York Immigration Coalition, about the fight over the 2020 Census. If you don’t know just how that relates to elections, you certainly should.

Plus, Janine Jackson takes a very quick look at press coverage of the midterms.


Trumps Judges Imperil Our Rights for Decades

In less than two years, Donald Trump has two installed not one, but two, right-wing justices on the Supreme Court, ensuring a conservative majority for decades to come.

Republican congressional leadership appropriated (stole?) a high Court appointment from Barack Obama and appointed Neil Gorsuch. Gorsuch has cast the deciding vote in 14 cases that hurt workers, consumers, voters, immigrants and reproductive rights, while upholding abuses of government authority. Notably, he cast the deciding vote to uphold Trumps Muslim travel ban in Trump v. Hawaii.

Republicans then pushed through the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh, who lied under oath and displayed conduct unbecoming a Justice. Just as Gorsuch has upheld the views of conservative Federalist Society and Heritage Foundation backers, Kavanaugh will surely do the same.

The public is less aware, however, of Trump’s systematic appointment of 29 right-wing judges on the federal circuit courts of appeals. And he hopes to appoint even more by year-end. These circuit court appointees have handed down regressive decisions favoring interests of the rich and upholding unlimited spending in politics. Judges who sit on the circuit courts wield enormous power because most cases are resolved at that level.

Seventh Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, for example, voted in one case to allow a corporation to racially segregate its workplace. She also rejected the asylum claim of an immigrant who alleged he was tortured, without even considering the case merits. In the Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar voted to allow public officials to lead Christian-only prayers at public Board of Commissioners meetings.

These decisions are just the tip of the iceberg.

Guest – Attorney Marjorie Cohn, professor emerita at Thomas Jefferson School of Law where she taught for 25 years. The former president of the National Lawyers Guild and criminal defense attorney is a legal scholar and political analyst who writesbooks andarticles, and lectures throughout the world about human rights, US foreign policy, and the contradiction between the two. She has testified before Congress and debated the legality of the war in Afghanistan at the prestigious Oxford Union. Her columns appear on Truthout, HuffPost, JURIST, Truthdig, Portside, Alternet, CommonDreams and Consortium News,and she has provided commentary for CBS News, BBC, MSNBC, CNN, Fox News, NPR and Pacifica Radio. Her website ishttp://marjoriecohn.com/

—-

The Nature of American Fascism
Iron Heel 2

111 years ago American socialist and famed novelist Jack London in his book The Iron Heel anticipated what we are seeing developing in the USA today. He wrote There is a shadow of something colossal and menacing that even now is beginning to fall across the land. Call it the shadow of an oligarchy if you will; it is the nearest I dare approximate it. What its nature may be I refuse to imagine. But what I wanted to say was this: you are in a perilous position.

With our experience with fascism in the 20th century in Germany and Italy and with what we see developing in the USA right now we can clearly imagine what American fascism would look like.

– Socialism would be illegal and its proponents imprisoned
– Labor unions would be totally illuminated as an organization for those without property
– Quality public education would be further reduced
– The independence of public universities would be totally undermined
– Billions of dollars would continually being devoted to slick propaganda
– Much of traditional government functions with the exception of the police and thearmed forces would be privatized
– The media and the Internet would be put under direct government control
– Human caused catastrophic climate change would not be addressed as anti-scientific thinking and anti-intellectualism would be encouraged in a fact free culture
– Minorities, blacks, Muslims, Jews, Mexicans, and lgtbq people would be scapegoated for societies ills.
– Women would be denied control over their own bodies
– Church and state would no longer be separated
– The rule of law would be cast aside.

Fascism doesnt just doesnt descend on us all at once like the falling of a dark curtain. It creeps in. It has been creeping in over the last 40 years of neoliberalism and with the rise of the ultra right who have taken over the Republican Party. All this was topped off to years ago with the election of Trump. In the last two weeks it has gotten even worse. Two black people were assassinated in Kentucky, 11 Jews were slaughtered inside there Pittsburgh synagogue, Trump canceled a nuclear non-proliferation pact with Russia, he declared himself a nationalist, really a white nationalist, and then sent 14,000 troops to the Mexican border to prevent desperate mostly women and children walking north from Honduras from claiming their lawful ride to asylum, and then he threatened to cancel birthright citizenship, a right guaranteed by the 14th amendment to our constitution.

We know which fascism looks like. We have identified it. But what do we do to fight it?

Contact email [email protected]

Guest – Barry Sheppard, a blogger from Oakland California, a longtime socialist, activist, and author.

————————–

Update: Hosts Discuss U.S. Primary Election


Bette Tate Beaver, Executive Director of The National Association of Multicultural Education (NAME), and Lewis Diuguid, Author and Journalist, share insights from their tour of the southern states featuring symbols of confederacy.

In addition, Boni Tolston educator, author and poet discusses the 2nd agreement of The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz.

Thoughtful Conversations
Episode date : August 25, 2018
On Urban Connections
Play

When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, it resulted in thousands of deaths and knocked out power for nearly a year. Further, the devastation worsened a debt crisis that’s crippled public services for years. So, residents of already-abandoned communities were not surprised when the official response was often nowhere to be seen. In the midst of the austerity and chaos, a quiet revolution had begun on the island. An impromptu community kitchen in one town grew into an island-wide network of mutual aid centers with the aim of restoring power — both electric and civic — to the people.

Featuring:

Judith Rodriguez – organizer, Caguas mutual aid center; Giovanni Roberto – organizer, Caguas mutual aid center; Astrid Cruz Negron – teacher and activist, Utuado mutual aid center; Ramonita Bonilla – resident of Las Marias; Jose Bella Flores – co-founder, Las Marias mutual aid center; Omar Reyes – co-founder Las Marias mutual aid center; Christine Nieves – co-founder, Mariana mutual aid center

Credits:

Funding for The Response was provided bythe Threshold and Shift Foundations.

Executive Producer/Host: Tom Llewellyn
Producer/Writer: Robert Raymond
Field Producer: Juan Carlos Dvila

Making Contact staff:

Executive Director: Lisa Rudman
Staff Producers: Anita Johnson, Monica Lopez, Salima Hamirani
Host: Monica Lopez
Audience Engagement Manager: Sabine Blaizin
Outreach and Distribution Assistant: Dylan Heuer

Music Credits:

Alamo, Glad Rags
Concrete Jungle, Audiobinger


Recent News

KKFI Jazz Calendar for February 5 – February 11

February 4, 2018 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for February 5 – February 11
KKFI Jazz Calendar for February 5 – February 11

This is the KKFI Jazz Event Calendar for the week of Monday, February 5th to Sunday, February 11th. This is shared for the benefit of jazz music lovers. Please check with the music venue to confirm details of the event. …

Read More →

KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 29 – February 4

January 28, 2018 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 29 – February 4
KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 29 – February 4

This is the KKFI Jazz Event Calendar for the week of Monday, January 29th to Sunday, Febuary 4th. This is shared for the benefit of jazz music lovers. Please check with the music venue to confirm details of the event. …

Read More →

KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 22 – January 28

January 21, 2018 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 22 – January 28
KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 22 – January 28

This is the KKFI Jazz Event Calendar for the week of Monday, January 22nd to Sunday, January 28th. This is shared for the benefit of jazz music lovers. Please check with the music venue to confirm details of the event. …

Read More →

KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 15 – January 21

January 14, 2018 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 15 – January 21
KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 15 – January 21

This is the KKFI Jazz Event Calendar for the week of Monday, January 15th to Sunday, January 21st. This is shared for the benefit of jazz music lovers. Please check with the music venue to confirm details of the event. …

Read More →

KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 8 – January 14

January 9, 2018 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 8 – January 14
KKFI Jazz Calendar for January 8 – January 14

This is the KKFI Jazz Event Calendar for the week of Monday, January 8th to Sunday, January 14th. This is shared for the benefit of jazz music lovers. Please check with the music venue to confirm details of the event. …

Read More →

Week of January 1 to Sunday, January 7

January 2, 2018 By KKFI 90.1 FM Comments Off on Week of January 1 to Sunday, January 7
Week of January 1 to Sunday, January 7

This is the KKFI Jazz Event Calendar for the week of Monday, January 1st to Sunday, January 7th. This is shared for the benefit of jazz music lovers. Please check with the music venue to confirm details of the event. …

Read More →

Page 9 of 80« First...7891011...203040...Last »