This week on CounterSpin: After years of a Saudi-led war, Yemen is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis on a scale hard to comprehend: at least 10,000 dead, looming famine and now a shocking outbreak of cholera. But US citizens looking to understand the US role—in driving the disaster or in potentially easing it—get little help from accounts like that of the Washington Post, which told readers, “It’s a complicated story.” Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral candidate and instructor at Harvard University, will join us to talk about what reports like that are leaving out.

Also on the program: Listeners know that hard-won net neutrality rules prohibit internet service providers from “blocking, throttling and paid prioritization” of internet content, and how important that level playing field has been—for everyone, but especially for those who historically and currently have had little voice in major media, including people of color, and for organizers. Former Verizon lawyer, now FCC chair Ajit Pai has had those rules in his sights since taking office, and now we’re facing a December vote to repeal them. So what now? We’ll hear what now from Erin Shields, national field organizer for internet rights with the Center for Media Justice.

ON Counterspin | December 5, 2017 | 6:30pm

Shireen Al-Adeimi on Yemen Crisis, Erin Shields on Net Neutrality Repeal

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This week on CounterSpin: After years of a Saudi-led war, Yemen is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis on a scale hard to comprehend: at least 10,000 dead, looming famine and now a shocking outbreak of cholera. But US citizens looking to understand the US role—in driving the disaster or in potentially easing it—get little help from accounts like that of the Washington Post, which told readers, “It’s a complicated story.” Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral candidate and instructor at Harvard University, will join us to talk about what reports like that are leaving out.

Also on the program: Listeners know that hard-won net neutrality rules prohibit internet service providers from “blocking, throttling and paid prioritization” of internet content, and how important that level playing field has been—for everyone, but especially for those who historically and currently have had little voice in major media, including people of color, and for organizers. Former Verizon lawyer, now FCC chair Ajit Pai has had those rules in his sights since taking office, and now we’re facing a December vote to repeal them. So what now? We’ll hear what now from Erin Shields, national field organizer for internet rights with the Center for Media Justice.

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