Today on Interfaith Voices:

God and Gridlock: Senate Chaplain Barry Black

“Oh God, cover our shame with the robe of your righteousness” — from the Senate Chaplain’s morning prayer, on day nine of the federal shutdown.

Every morning in the Senate begins with a prayer, delivered by Reverend Barry Black. As the government shutdown wore on and the debt limit loomed, Rev. Black didn’t waste the opportunity to gently reprimand the Senators with prayers like this one: “We acknowledge our transgressions, our shortcomings, our smugness, our selfishness and our pride.”

From Wiccan Love Child to Orthodox Jew

Joshua Safran was born in 1975 into a coven of witches. That included his mother, who was determined to keep her son out of the mainstream and off the grid. He spent his early childhood as a nomad, living everywhere from communes to old vans. One day he discovered he was Jewish, and after years of wandering, he finally felt he had found a home.

 

ON Interfaith Voices | October 22, 2013 | 12:00 pm

A Prayer for Sanity in Congress, My Mother the Witch, And More

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/52602cdfb990eweb_1342_barry_black_us_senate-wpcf_123x100.jpg

Today on Interfaith Voices:

God and Gridlock: Senate Chaplain Barry Black

“Oh God, cover our shame with the robe of your righteousness” — from the Senate Chaplain’s morning prayer, on day nine of the federal shutdown.

Every morning in the Senate begins with a prayer, delivered by Reverend Barry Black. As the government shutdown wore on and the debt limit loomed, Rev. Black didn’t waste the opportunity to gently reprimand the Senators with prayers like this one: “We acknowledge our transgressions, our shortcomings, our smugness, our selfishness and our pride.”

From Wiccan Love Child to Orthodox Jew

Joshua Safran was born in 1975 into a coven of witches. That included his mother, who was determined to keep her son out of the mainstream and off the grid. He spent his early childhood as a nomad, living everywhere from communes to old vans. One day he discovered he was Jewish, and after years of wandering, he finally felt he had found a home.

 

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