Bioneers are successful employing the market the economics of nature to demonstrate how we can solve two of our most intractable environmental challenges: energy and agriculture. In a few decades, the U.S. can get completely off oil, as physicist Amory Lovins compellingly shows.  Economist and anthropologist Jason Clay presents profitable examples of modeling nature’s economics, from clean shrimp farms in Asia to healthy potatoes in Wisconsin.

Featured speakers/guests:

Amory Bloch Lovins (born November 13, 1947)[3] is an American physicist, environmental scientist, writer, and Chairman/Chief Scientist of the Rocky Mountain Institute. He has worked in the field of energy policy and related areas for four decades. He was named by Time magazine one of the World’s 100 most influential people in 2009.

Lovins worked professionally as an environmentalist in the 1970s and since then as an analyst of a “soft energy path” for the United States and other nations. He has promoted energy efficiency, the use of renewable energy sources, and the generation of energy at or near the site where the energy is actually used. Lovins has also advocated a “negawatt revolution” arguing that utility customers don’t want kilowatt-hours of electricity; they want energy services. In the 1990s, his work with Rocky Mountain Institute included the design of an ultra-efficient automobile, the Hypercar.

Lovins has received ten honorary doctorates and won many awards. He has provided expert testimony in eight countries, briefed 19 heads of state, and published 29 books. These books include Reinventing Fire, Winning the Oil Endgame, Small is Profitable, Brittle Power, and Natural Capitalism.

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Dr. Jason Clay is World Wildlife Fund’s senior vice president for market transformation. He is a thought leader in the NGO community about global trends, supply chain management issues, and convening multi-stakeholder groups to work together on pre-competitive issues. Clay is a globally recognized expert on certification and food production. He created one of the world’s first ecolabels and helped develop standards for more than a dozen commodities through multi-stakeholder processes that reduce the impacts of production. Over the course of his career, Clay has run a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale Universities, worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, helped create hundreds of products such as Rainforest Crunch with Ben & Jerry’s, and spent more than 30 years working with environmental and human rights organizations. Clay studied at Harvard University and the London School of Economics, and received his Ph.D. in anthropology at Cornell University. He founded the award-winning Cultural Survival Quarterly and is the author of more than 300 articles and 15 books, World Agriculture and the Environment. In addition to his WWF role, Clay is the first-ever Food and Sustainability Fellow of the National Geographic Society.

ON Bioneers | December 6, 2013 | 9:30 am

Aligning Business with Biology: Breakthrough Economics

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/220px-Amory_Lovins1-wpcf_220x100.jpg

Bioneers are successful employing the market the economics of nature to demonstrate how we can solve two of our most intractable environmental challenges: energy and agriculture. In a few decades, the U.S. can get completely off oil, as physicist Amory Lovins compellingly shows.  Economist and anthropologist Jason Clay presents profitable examples of modeling nature’s economics, from clean shrimp farms in Asia to healthy potatoes in Wisconsin.

Featured speakers/guests:

Amory Bloch Lovins (born November 13, 1947)[3] is an American physicist, environmental scientist, writer, and Chairman/Chief Scientist of the Rocky Mountain Institute. He has worked in the field of energy policy and related areas for four decades. He was named by Time magazine one of the World’s 100 most influential people in 2009.

Lovins worked professionally as an environmentalist in the 1970s and since then as an analyst of a “soft energy path” for the United States and other nations. He has promoted energy efficiency, the use of renewable energy sources, and the generation of energy at or near the site where the energy is actually used. Lovins has also advocated a “negawatt revolution” arguing that utility customers don’t want kilowatt-hours of electricity; they want energy services. In the 1990s, his work with Rocky Mountain Institute included the design of an ultra-efficient automobile, the Hypercar.

Lovins has received ten honorary doctorates and won many awards. He has provided expert testimony in eight countries, briefed 19 heads of state, and published 29 books. These books include Reinventing Fire, Winning the Oil Endgame, Small is Profitable, Brittle Power, and Natural Capitalism.

************

Dr. Jason Clay is World Wildlife Fund’s senior vice president for market transformation. He is a thought leader in the NGO community about global trends, supply chain management issues, and convening multi-stakeholder groups to work together on pre-competitive issues. Clay is a globally recognized expert on certification and food production. He created one of the world’s first ecolabels and helped develop standards for more than a dozen commodities through multi-stakeholder processes that reduce the impacts of production. Over the course of his career, Clay has run a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale Universities, worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, helped create hundreds of products such as Rainforest Crunch with Ben & Jerry’s, and spent more than 30 years working with environmental and human rights organizations. Clay studied at Harvard University and the London School of Economics, and received his Ph.D. in anthropology at Cornell University. He founded the award-winning Cultural Survival Quarterly and is the author of more than 300 articles and 15 books, World Agriculture and the Environment. In addition to his WWF role, Clay is the first-ever Food and Sustainability Fellow of the National Geographic Society.

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