This week on Tell Somebody, host Tom Klammer is pleased to welcome Cecile Pineda to the show to discuss her new tome, Devil’s Tango: How I Learned the Fukushima Step By Step.

About the book (from Amazon.com):

As much personal journal as investigative journalism, this account traces the worsening developments at Fukushima Daiichi during the first year following the nuclear disaster. Often poetic in tone and philosophic in scope, this day-to-day reportage is peppered with the author’s reflections and dramatic monologues as she investigates the public’s willing blindness toward the nuclear power industry’s disregard for public safety in the pursuit of profit. The book offers a unique perspective and attempts to come to terms with Fukushima’s catastrophic consequences on the planet.

Excerpt of review by Jeff Biggers of The Huffington Post:

“In Devil’s Tango, Pineda brings together a refreshingly bold command of the facts and myths of the nuclear industry with her extraordinary prose to offer a rare look into many of the overlooked implications of the Fukushima tragedy. In the tradition of French author Andre Malraux’s “Anti-Memoirs,” Pineda “answers questions that memoirs do not pose and does not answer those they do pose, and also because one finds in it, often linked to tragedy, an irrefutable and gliding presence.” That presence for Pineda is the haunting reality of nuclear energy revealed in Japan, but connected to our lives far across the ocean. She draws on her residency in Austria during the Chernobyl nuclear disaster; she examines scientific studies and government reports alongside absurdist theatre pieces….Turning her focus on all 104 nuclear plants in the U.S., Pineda’s searing account ultimately asks the reader: ‘What is right? What right have we to do what is right? What right remains to us, knowing the little that we know?’

In the end, with an unremittingly courageous if not prophetic voice, Pineda’s day-to-day exposé transcends the ruts of most energy debates to raise these larger questions about one of the seminal crises of our times.”

ON Tell Somebody | May 21, 2013 | 9:00 am

Author Cecile Pineda this week!

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/cecilepineda2-wpcf_183x100.jpg

This week on Tell Somebody, host Tom Klammer is pleased to welcome Cecile Pineda to the show to discuss her new tome, Devil’s Tango: How I Learned the Fukushima Step By Step.

About the book (from Amazon.com):

As much personal journal as investigative journalism, this account traces the worsening developments at Fukushima Daiichi during the first year following the nuclear disaster. Often poetic in tone and philosophic in scope, this day-to-day reportage is peppered with the author’s reflections and dramatic monologues as she investigates the public’s willing blindness toward the nuclear power industry’s disregard for public safety in the pursuit of profit. The book offers a unique perspective and attempts to come to terms with Fukushima’s catastrophic consequences on the planet.

Excerpt of review by Jeff Biggers of The Huffington Post:

“In Devil’s Tango, Pineda brings together a refreshingly bold command of the facts and myths of the nuclear industry with her extraordinary prose to offer a rare look into many of the overlooked implications of the Fukushima tragedy. In the tradition of French author Andre Malraux’s “Anti-Memoirs,” Pineda “answers questions that memoirs do not pose and does not answer those they do pose, and also because one finds in it, often linked to tragedy, an irrefutable and gliding presence.” That presence for Pineda is the haunting reality of nuclear energy revealed in Japan, but connected to our lives far across the ocean. She draws on her residency in Austria during the Chernobyl nuclear disaster; she examines scientific studies and government reports alongside absurdist theatre pieces….Turning her focus on all 104 nuclear plants in the U.S., Pineda’s searing account ultimately asks the reader: ‘What is right? What right have we to do what is right? What right remains to us, knowing the little that we know?’

In the end, with an unremittingly courageous if not prophetic voice, Pineda’s day-to-day exposé transcends the ruts of most energy debates to raise these larger questions about one of the seminal crises of our times.”

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