Priscilla Stuckey begins this conversation by telling three stories — how an eagle, a bougainvillea bush, and the birch tree of her childhood all communicated with her in some way. We think we are alone, but Stuckey points out “we are deeply connected with all others with whom we share our lives.” She encourages us to be aware of our connection with all the life that surrounds us, even in cities. In response to the idea that the world is a community rather than a collection of objects, she poses the question: “How do we interact with the more than human world as equal members of community, rather than trying to treat the world around us as if it was created only to serve human needs?” She gives an example of how a neighborhood became a land trust and cleaned up Peralta creek. She also tells the story of being kissed by a wild red fox. This conversation serves as an example of what we can do together to care for the earth. (hosted by Justine Willis Toms)

 

Bio 

Priscilla Stuckey is a writer, book editor, scholar, and Earth-advocate. She teaches humanities at Prescott College and holds a Ph.D, in religious studies and feminist theory from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California.

She is the author of:

To learn more about the work of Priscilla Stuckey go to www.priscillastuckey.com.

Topics explored in this dialogue include:

  • How a community of listeners goes beyond merely human life
  • How a birch tree came in a vision to say good-bye
  • How we have exiled ourselves from the more than human world
  • How we can become stewards of land rather than owners of land
  • How she participated in saving Peralta Creek
  • Why we need to place ourselves by the contours of the land rather than by streets or county lines
  • How a rescue dog changed her life
  • What she learned by being French kissed by Rudy the wild fox

Host: Justine Willis Toms            Interview Date: 1/21/2013           Program Number: 3463

ON New Dimensions | January 6, 2014 | 5:00 am

Beyond Humans, Widening Our Circle Of Friends with Priscilla Stuckey, Ph.D.

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/Priscilla-Stuckey-150x150-wpcf_150x100.jpg

Priscilla Stuckey begins this conversation by telling three stories — how an eagle, a bougainvillea bush, and the birch tree of her childhood all communicated with her in some way. We think we are alone, but Stuckey points out “we are deeply connected with all others with whom we share our lives.” She encourages us to be aware of our connection with all the life that surrounds us, even in cities. In response to the idea that the world is a community rather than a collection of objects, she poses the question: “How do we interact with the more than human world as equal members of community, rather than trying to treat the world around us as if it was created only to serve human needs?” She gives an example of how a neighborhood became a land trust and cleaned up Peralta creek. She also tells the story of being kissed by a wild red fox. This conversation serves as an example of what we can do together to care for the earth. (hosted by Justine Willis Toms)

 

Bio 

Priscilla Stuckey is a writer, book editor, scholar, and Earth-advocate. She teaches humanities at Prescott College and holds a Ph.D, in religious studies and feminist theory from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California.

She is the author of:

To learn more about the work of Priscilla Stuckey go to www.priscillastuckey.com.

Topics explored in this dialogue include:

  • How a community of listeners goes beyond merely human life
  • How a birch tree came in a vision to say good-bye
  • How we have exiled ourselves from the more than human world
  • How we can become stewards of land rather than owners of land
  • How she participated in saving Peralta Creek
  • Why we need to place ourselves by the contours of the land rather than by streets or county lines
  • How a rescue dog changed her life
  • What she learned by being French kissed by Rudy the wild fox

Host: Justine Willis Toms            Interview Date: 1/21/2013           Program Number: 3463

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