This edition of L.A. Theatre Works features a 2004 performance of Hugh Whitmore‘s Breaking The Code, starring Simon Templeman as brilliant mathematician Alan Turing, the man who cracked the German Enigma code and enabled the Allies to win World War II. But Turing was to find that the country he saved cared less about his genius and more about his sexual orientation.  This is an L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: Simon Templeman, Sheelagh Cullen, Kenneth Danziger, Peter Dennis, Samantha Robson, Orlando Seale, W. Morgan Sheppard and Andre Sogliuzzo.

About the playwright:

Hugh Whitemore (born 1936) is an English playwright and screenwriter.

Whitemore studied for the stage at London‘s Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where he is now a Member of the Council. He began his writing career in British television with both original teleplays and adaptations of classic works by Charles Dickens, W. Somerset Maugham, Daphne du Maurier, and Charlotte Brontë, among others, and twice won a Writers’ Guild of Great Britain award. His work for American TV includes Concealed Enemies, about the Alger Hiss case, and The Gathering Storm, which focused on a troubled period in the marriage of Clementine and Winston Churchill just prior to World War II. He won an Emmy Award for each. He also was nominated for his adaptation of the Carl Bernstein/Bob Woodward book about President Nixon, The Final Days. His most recent teleplay was My House in Umbria (2003), an adaptation of the novella by William Trevor starring Maggie Smith. He also wrote the episode, Horrible Conspiracies, for the 1971 BBC series, Elizabeth R.

Whitemore’s film credits include: Man at the Top (1973), All Creatures Great and Small (1975), The Blue Bird (1976), The Return of the Soldier (1982), 84 Charing Cross Road (1987), and Utz (1992).

The plots of Whitemore’s plays frequently focus on historical figures. Stevie (1977) centred on the life of English poet and novelist Stevie Smith and Pack of Lies (1983) covered events leading up to the arrest of the Krogers, two Americans spying for the Russians, in London in 1961. Whitemore’s best known work taking the form of a staged biography is Breaking the Code (1986) which is centered on Alan Turing, who was responsible for cracking the German Enigma code during World War II and resisted an adherence to the English code of sexual discretion with his homosexuality, for which he was charged with gross indecency. This work was adapted as a television film in 1996. The Best of Friends (1987), about the friendship Dame Laurentia McLachlan, the Abbess of Stanbrook Abbey in Worcestershire, shared with George Bernard Shaw and Sydney Cockerell, director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. His most recent was As You Desire Me, a 2005 adaptation of the play by Luigi Pirandello.

Whitemore is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

ON L.A. Theatre Works | June 26, 2013 | 7:00 pm

Breaking The Code

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/BreakingTheCode-wpcf_205x100.jpg

This edition of L.A. Theatre Works features a 2004 performance of Hugh Whitmore‘s Breaking The Code, starring Simon Templeman as brilliant mathematician Alan Turing, the man who cracked the German Enigma code and enabled the Allies to win World War II. But Turing was to find that the country he saved cared less about his genius and more about his sexual orientation.  This is an L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: Simon Templeman, Sheelagh Cullen, Kenneth Danziger, Peter Dennis, Samantha Robson, Orlando Seale, W. Morgan Sheppard and Andre Sogliuzzo.

About the playwright:

Hugh Whitemore (born 1936) is an English playwright and screenwriter.

Whitemore studied for the stage at London‘s Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where he is now a Member of the Council. He began his writing career in British television with both original teleplays and adaptations of classic works by Charles Dickens, W. Somerset Maugham, Daphne du Maurier, and Charlotte Brontë, among others, and twice won a Writers’ Guild of Great Britain award. His work for American TV includes Concealed Enemies, about the Alger Hiss case, and The Gathering Storm, which focused on a troubled period in the marriage of Clementine and Winston Churchill just prior to World War II. He won an Emmy Award for each. He also was nominated for his adaptation of the Carl Bernstein/Bob Woodward book about President Nixon, The Final Days. His most recent teleplay was My House in Umbria (2003), an adaptation of the novella by William Trevor starring Maggie Smith. He also wrote the episode, Horrible Conspiracies, for the 1971 BBC series, Elizabeth R.

Whitemore’s film credits include: Man at the Top (1973), All Creatures Great and Small (1975), The Blue Bird (1976), The Return of the Soldier (1982), 84 Charing Cross Road (1987), and Utz (1992).

The plots of Whitemore’s plays frequently focus on historical figures. Stevie (1977) centred on the life of English poet and novelist Stevie Smith and Pack of Lies (1983) covered events leading up to the arrest of the Krogers, two Americans spying for the Russians, in London in 1961. Whitemore’s best known work taking the form of a staged biography is Breaking the Code (1986) which is centered on Alan Turing, who was responsible for cracking the German Enigma code during World War II and resisted an adherence to the English code of sexual discretion with his homosexuality, for which he was charged with gross indecency. This work was adapted as a television film in 1996. The Best of Friends (1987), about the friendship Dame Laurentia McLachlan, the Abbess of Stanbrook Abbey in Worcestershire, shared with George Bernard Shaw and Sydney Cockerell, director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. His most recent was As You Desire Me, a 2005 adaptation of the play by Luigi Pirandello.

Whitemore is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

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