This week Dr Helen Caldicott talks to Ann Wright, a diplomat and retired Colonel from the US Army .Ann is also a peace activist and co-author of Dissent: Voices of Conscience, published by Koa books in 2007.

She holds a masters degree in law, and a masters degree in national security affairs from the US Naval War College.

In 1987, Colonel Wright joined the Foreign Service and served as U.S. Deputy Ambassador in Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. She received the State Department’s Award for Heroism for her actions during the evacuation of 2,500 people from the civil war in Sierra Leone.

She holds a masters degree in law, and a masters degree in national security affairs from the US Naval War College.

In 1987, Colonel Wright joined the Foreign Service and served as U.S. Deputy Ambassador in Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. She received the State Department’s Award for Heroism for her actions during the evacuation of 2,500 people from the civil war in Sierra Leone.

ON If You Love This Planet | October 5, 2012 | 4:00 am

Colonel Ann Wright

This week Dr Helen Caldicott talks to Ann Wright, a diplomat and retired Colonel from the US Army .Ann is also a peace activist and co-author of Dissent: Voices of Conscience, published by Koa books in 2007.

She holds a masters degree in law, and a masters degree in national security affairs from the US Naval War College.

In 1987, Colonel Wright joined the Foreign Service and served as U.S. Deputy Ambassador in Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. She received the State Department’s Award for Heroism for her actions during the evacuation of 2,500 people from the civil war in Sierra Leone.

She holds a masters degree in law, and a masters degree in national security affairs from the US Naval War College.

In 1987, Colonel Wright joined the Foreign Service and served as U.S. Deputy Ambassador in Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. She received the State Department’s Award for Heroism for her actions during the evacuation of 2,500 people from the civil war in Sierra Leone.

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