This week on Interfaith Voices:

How Far Does Religious Liberty Go?

Here’s the scenario: two men, or two women, walk into a bakery to order a wedding cake. The owner, a devout Christian, believes same-sex marriage is a sin and refuses to serve them. The couple say it’s plain discrimination. Scenes like this are actually being played out across the country, as a handful of states consider a controversial bill like the one just vetoed in Arizona. Two sides weigh in on why the bill caused such an uproar.

War in Africa: Faith or Economics?

Conflict a year old continues to rage in the Central African Republic. Last March, a coup by Muslim rebels from the north ignited widespread crime and looting. Backlash by the Christian majority has left Muslims fleeing for their lives. But is this conflict really about religious difference? An NPR correspondent says the truth may have more to do with economics and social status.

Experiments with Religion in the Internet’s Early Days

Those first days of the Internet – the 80s to early 90s – were a virtual Wild West, when no one knew exactly what the Web could do, and anything seemed possible. Religious folks were some of the first people to latch on to the new technology, and they came up with all kinds of ways to explore spirituality in the digital realm. Some have lasted (prayer chat rooms) and some haven’t (the ‘noosphere’).

Featured speakers/guests:

Kellie Fiedorek, attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom
Rob Boston, director of communications for Americans United for the Separation of Church and State

Gregory Warner, East Africa correspondent for NPR

Heidi Campbell, associate professor of communications at Texas A&M University
Gregory Grieve,
associate professor of religious studies at University of North Carolian Greensboro

ON Interfaith Voices | March 11, 2014 | 12:00 pm

Debating Religious Freedom, The ‘Noosphere’ and Other Online Experiments, and More

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/5318efd3b024aweb_1410_arizonabill_nooccar_flickr-wpcf_123x100.jpg

This week on Interfaith Voices:

How Far Does Religious Liberty Go?

Here’s the scenario: two men, or two women, walk into a bakery to order a wedding cake. The owner, a devout Christian, believes same-sex marriage is a sin and refuses to serve them. The couple say it’s plain discrimination. Scenes like this are actually being played out across the country, as a handful of states consider a controversial bill like the one just vetoed in Arizona. Two sides weigh in on why the bill caused such an uproar.

War in Africa: Faith or Economics?

Conflict a year old continues to rage in the Central African Republic. Last March, a coup by Muslim rebels from the north ignited widespread crime and looting. Backlash by the Christian majority has left Muslims fleeing for their lives. But is this conflict really about religious difference? An NPR correspondent says the truth may have more to do with economics and social status.

Experiments with Religion in the Internet’s Early Days

Those first days of the Internet – the 80s to early 90s – were a virtual Wild West, when no one knew exactly what the Web could do, and anything seemed possible. Religious folks were some of the first people to latch on to the new technology, and they came up with all kinds of ways to explore spirituality in the digital realm. Some have lasted (prayer chat rooms) and some haven’t (the ‘noosphere’).

Featured speakers/guests:

Kellie Fiedorek, attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom
Rob Boston, director of communications for Americans United for the Separation of Church and State

Gregory Warner, East Africa correspondent for NPR

Heidi Campbell, associate professor of communications at Texas A&M University
Gregory Grieve,
associate professor of religious studies at University of North Carolian Greensboro

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