This week on CounterSpin: Looking back at Equal Pay Day, April 2, it seems strange that when the subject is the fact that women continue to be paid less than men for the same work—and women of color still less—such a lot of the conversation is not about how we can fix the problem quickly and concretely, but about whether the numbers really say what they seem to; or whether maybe it’s not so bad; or women’s fault; or will, left alone, get better over time. We’ll talk about the persistent reality of the gender pay gap with Deborah Vagins, senior vice president for public policy and research at the American Association of University Women.

 

Also on the show: We’ve just passed the April 4 anniversary of the 1968 killing of Martin Luther King Jr., hounded for years, listeners will know, by the FBI, which sought to disrupt and discredit the powerful protest of King and other black activists with a program called COINTELPRO. What for many is a shameful episode in US history seems to be a source of inspiration for today’s FBI, whose fabrication of a category of domestic threat dubbed “Black Identity Extremism” seems to have eerily similar goals. We’ll talk with Nusrat Choudhury, deputy director of the ACLU Racial Justice Program, about efforts to expose and resist the FBI’s dangerous ideas.

 

ON Counterspin | April 16, 2019 | 6:30pm

Deborah Vagins on Gender Pay Gap, Nusrat Choudhury on the New COINTELPRO

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This week on CounterSpin: Looking back at Equal Pay Day, April 2, it seems strange that when the subject is the fact that women continue to be paid less than men for the same work—and women of color still less—such a lot of the conversation is not about how we can fix the problem quickly and concretely, but about whether the numbers really say what they seem to; or whether maybe it’s not so bad; or women’s fault; or will, left alone, get better over time. We’ll talk about the persistent reality of the gender pay gap with Deborah Vagins, senior vice president for public policy and research at the American Association of University Women.

 

Also on the show: We’ve just passed the April 4 anniversary of the 1968 killing of Martin Luther King Jr., hounded for years, listeners will know, by the FBI, which sought to disrupt and discredit the powerful protest of King and other black activists with a program called COINTELPRO. What for many is a shameful episode in US history seems to be a source of inspiration for today’s FBI, whose fabrication of a category of domestic threat dubbed “Black Identity Extremism” seems to have eerily similar goals. We’ll talk with Nusrat Choudhury, deputy director of the ACLU Racial Justice Program, about efforts to expose and resist the FBI’s dangerous ideas.

 

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