Guest 1: Dr. Brian Greene, Columbia physicist, author of Elegant Universe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Elegant Universe:
Superstrings, Hidden
Dimensions, and the Quest
for the Ultimate Theory
TheElegantUniverse.jpg

The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory is a book by Brian Greene published in 1999, which introduces string and superstring theory, and provides a comprehensive though non-technical assessment of the theory and some of its shortcomings. In 2000, it won the Royal Society Prize for General and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize Nonfiction. A new edition was released in 2003, with an updated preface.
Guest 2: Dr. Lisa Randall, Harvard physicist, higher dimensions

Lisa Randall (born June 18, 1962) is an American theoretical physicist and a leading expert on particle physics and cosmology. She works on several of the competing models of string theory in the quest to explain the fabric of the universe. Her best known contribution to the field is the Randall-Sundrum model, first published in 1999 with Raman Sundrum.[1] However, the Large Hadron Collider has failed to provide any evidence to substantiate the validity of this theory[citation needed]. She was the first tenured woman in the Princeton University physics department and the first tenured female theoretical physicist at both MIT and Harvard University. She has also written two popular science books and the libretto of an opera.

ON Exploration | March 11, 2013 | 5:00 am

Elegant Universe

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Guest 1: Dr. Brian Greene, Columbia physicist, author of Elegant Universe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Elegant Universe:
Superstrings, Hidden
Dimensions, and the Quest
for the Ultimate Theory
TheElegantUniverse.jpg

The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory is a book by Brian Greene published in 1999, which introduces string and superstring theory, and provides a comprehensive though non-technical assessment of the theory and some of its shortcomings. In 2000, it won the Royal Society Prize for General and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize Nonfiction. A new edition was released in 2003, with an updated preface.
Guest 2: Dr. Lisa Randall, Harvard physicist, higher dimensions

Lisa Randall (born June 18, 1962) is an American theoretical physicist and a leading expert on particle physics and cosmology. She works on several of the competing models of string theory in the quest to explain the fabric of the universe. Her best known contribution to the field is the Randall-Sundrum model, first published in 1999 with Raman Sundrum.[1] However, the Large Hadron Collider has failed to provide any evidence to substantiate the validity of this theory[citation needed]. She was the first tenured woman in the Princeton University physics department and the first tenured female theoretical physicist at both MIT and Harvard University. She has also written two popular science books and the libretto of an opera.

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