How can we get fresh food locally grown in the cold Midwestern winters?  On this EcoRadio, we learn about extending the growing and harvest seasons through the months with “r’ in them.  Discussing beneficial techniques like row covers, high tunnels and selecting winter-hardy varieties will be Cary Rivard, Director of the K-State Research and Extension Center and Mark Gawron, Director of Metro Farms and Food Systems with CultivateKC, along with our new co-host and small farmer, Brent Ragsdale.

Kansas State Research and Extension Center-Olathe

All universities engage in research and teaching. But the 100 land-grant colleges and universities across the country have a third critical mission — extension.

The national Cooperative Extension Service was created with the passage of the Smith-Lever Act in 1914. The service was created to assure that research-based knowledge developed by the land-grant universities got delivered to the people at the county level.

Along with research and teaching, land-grant institutions “extend” their resources through non-formal, non-credit educational programs.

As the local branch of Kansas State University Research and Extension (Kansas’ land-grant university), this Extension Office has served Johnson County citizens since 1917.

We have access to the latest science, research and technology on subjects in five program areas. Our agents are university faculty. Their role is to encourage the application of this research-based information to help improve the quality of life for our residents.

Facility Description:

342 acres that include:

♦ 150 acres native woodland
♦ 75 acres bottomland
♦ 117 acres upland soil grassland
♦ Creek running through site
♦ Blend of soil types to meet a variety of needs

CultivateKC

Cultivate Kansas City grows food, farms, and community in support of a sustainable and healthy local food system for all.  Cultivate Kansas City was founded by organic farmers. At its core, organic farming values diversity, interconnectedness, and life. These values underlie our work in building a sustainable, local food system for Kansas City. In the years to come, it is clear that we need to be vocal and powerful advocates for these values – recognizing that diversity give us strength, resiliency, and adaptability in all aspects of our collective lives.

As an organization:

We stand with the farmers in our New Roots for Refugees program, their families and communities who enrich our local food system with their farming knowledge, hard work, and diverse food crops.

We stand with black urban growers who are creating change in their neighborhoods through food, who are joining forces to develop leadership as business owners, community leaders, educators, and advocates.

We stand with our all of our farmers – white, Latino, women, LGBTQ, Muslim, Jewish, and others – whose skills and agricultural and culinary heritages enrich our growing community.

We stand with everyone who eats, we all deserve access to nutritious, affordable, culturally-appropriate, and locally grown food that is raised with care for the well-being of the land, workers, and animals.

We stand with those working to prevent further damage to our climate – as growers, we know the impact of rising temperatures and extreme climate events on our ability to grow food and feed ourselves. We are committed to work toward education and innovation to protect our planet.

We stand with those who work for a democracy based on the premise that all people are created equal and that share our values of diversity, inter-connectivity, and life. Cultivate Kansas City seeks to create a democratic, just and sustainable food system; our efforts are profoundly connected to the work of other people and organizations who pursue democracy, justice, and sustainability in other aspects of our human lives.

Food is a beautifully unifying force. We commit to working to find common ground among farmers who are engaged in the hard and critical work of feeding our communities and the world.

ON EcoRadio KC | January 14, 2019 | 6:00 pm

Extending the Growing Season Locally

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How can we get fresh food locally grown in the cold Midwestern winters?  On this EcoRadio, we learn about extending the growing and harvest seasons through the months with “r’ in them.  Discussing beneficial techniques like row covers, high tunnels and selecting winter-hardy varieties will be Cary Rivard, Director of the K-State Research and Extension Center and Mark Gawron, Director of Metro Farms and Food Systems with CultivateKC, along with our new co-host and small farmer, Brent Ragsdale.

Kansas State Research and Extension Center-Olathe

All universities engage in research and teaching. But the 100 land-grant colleges and universities across the country have a third critical mission — extension.

The national Cooperative Extension Service was created with the passage of the Smith-Lever Act in 1914. The service was created to assure that research-based knowledge developed by the land-grant universities got delivered to the people at the county level.

Along with research and teaching, land-grant institutions “extend” their resources through non-formal, non-credit educational programs.

As the local branch of Kansas State University Research and Extension (Kansas’ land-grant university), this Extension Office has served Johnson County citizens since 1917.

We have access to the latest science, research and technology on subjects in five program areas. Our agents are university faculty. Their role is to encourage the application of this research-based information to help improve the quality of life for our residents.

Facility Description:

342 acres that include:

♦ 150 acres native woodland
♦ 75 acres bottomland
♦ 117 acres upland soil grassland
♦ Creek running through site
♦ Blend of soil types to meet a variety of needs

CultivateKC

Cultivate Kansas City grows food, farms, and community in support of a sustainable and healthy local food system for all.  Cultivate Kansas City was founded by organic farmers. At its core, organic farming values diversity, interconnectedness, and life. These values underlie our work in building a sustainable, local food system for Kansas City. In the years to come, it is clear that we need to be vocal and powerful advocates for these values – recognizing that diversity give us strength, resiliency, and adaptability in all aspects of our collective lives.

As an organization:

We stand with the farmers in our New Roots for Refugees program, their families and communities who enrich our local food system with their farming knowledge, hard work, and diverse food crops.

We stand with black urban growers who are creating change in their neighborhoods through food, who are joining forces to develop leadership as business owners, community leaders, educators, and advocates.

We stand with our all of our farmers – white, Latino, women, LGBTQ, Muslim, Jewish, and others – whose skills and agricultural and culinary heritages enrich our growing community.

We stand with everyone who eats, we all deserve access to nutritious, affordable, culturally-appropriate, and locally grown food that is raised with care for the well-being of the land, workers, and animals.

We stand with those working to prevent further damage to our climate – as growers, we know the impact of rising temperatures and extreme climate events on our ability to grow food and feed ourselves. We are committed to work toward education and innovation to protect our planet.

We stand with those who work for a democracy based on the premise that all people are created equal and that share our values of diversity, inter-connectivity, and life. Cultivate Kansas City seeks to create a democratic, just and sustainable food system; our efforts are profoundly connected to the work of other people and organizations who pursue democracy, justice, and sustainability in other aspects of our human lives.

Food is a beautifully unifying force. We commit to working to find common ground among farmers who are engaged in the hard and critical work of feeding our communities and the world.

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