It’s been 12 years since the last Bridget Jones movie. It’s amazing how little she’s evolved in the meantime. Rene Zellweger and Colin Firth are back, this time joined by Patrick Dempsey in a love triangle involving Bridget’s pregnancy and her doubts about the identity of the baby’s father. Her antics were amusing when she was young and stupid. At middle age, they seem a bit embarrassing. The cast is likable, but “Baby” is labored.

Seventeen years ago, “The Blair Witch Project” created a new movie genre, the “Found Footage Film.” The reboot “Blair Witch” comes from Columbia, MO, screenwriter Simon Barrett and his frequent collaborator, director Adam Wingard. There is nothing new here, but horror fans may enjoy a few familiar shocks in this creepy entry.

The concert documentary, “Hillsong: Let Hope Rise,” focuses on the phenomenon known as Hillsong United, a Christian pop band that sprang from an Australian mega church. Fans should love the inspiring music and candid behind the scenes footage.

Oscar-winning director Ron Howard turns his attention to the Fab Four with his compelling and immersive documentary about The Beatles during their heyday. “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week –The Touring Years” boasts a wealth of archival footage, catchy music and talking head memories from everyone involved, plus celebrity interviews with Beatles fans like Elvis Costello and Whoopie Goldberg. If you needed a reminder of how great this band was, this is it.

Also opening this week, “Snowden” is the latest film from incendiary director Oliver Stone. Joseph Gordon Levitt plays Edward Snowden, the NSA employee who leaked sensitive surveillance info. “Mr. Church” stars Eddie Murphy in a drama about a cook becomes something of a surrogate father for the little girl whose family he serves. “Hieronymous (Hi RON-EE-moose) Bosch, Touched by the Devil” is a documentary about the early Dutch painter.

ON Freeze Frame | September 16, 2016 | Noon on "Arts Magazine"

FREEZE FRAME: “Bridget Jones’s Baby,” “Blair Witch,” “Hillsong: Let Hope Rise,” “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week”

Play

It’s been 12 years since the last Bridget Jones movie. It’s amazing how little she’s evolved in the meantime. Rene Zellweger and Colin Firth are back, this time joined by Patrick Dempsey in a love triangle involving Bridget’s pregnancy and her doubts about the identity of the baby’s father. Her antics were amusing when she was young and stupid. At middle age, they seem a bit embarrassing. The cast is likable, but “Baby” is labored.

Seventeen years ago, “The Blair Witch Project” created a new movie genre, the “Found Footage Film.” The reboot “Blair Witch” comes from Columbia, MO, screenwriter Simon Barrett and his frequent collaborator, director Adam Wingard. There is nothing new here, but horror fans may enjoy a few familiar shocks in this creepy entry.

The concert documentary, “Hillsong: Let Hope Rise,” focuses on the phenomenon known as Hillsong United, a Christian pop band that sprang from an Australian mega church. Fans should love the inspiring music and candid behind the scenes footage.

Oscar-winning director Ron Howard turns his attention to the Fab Four with his compelling and immersive documentary about The Beatles during their heyday. “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week –The Touring Years” boasts a wealth of archival footage, catchy music and talking head memories from everyone involved, plus celebrity interviews with Beatles fans like Elvis Costello and Whoopie Goldberg. If you needed a reminder of how great this band was, this is it.

Also opening this week, “Snowden” is the latest film from incendiary director Oliver Stone. Joseph Gordon Levitt plays Edward Snowden, the NSA employee who leaked sensitive surveillance info. “Mr. Church” stars Eddie Murphy in a drama about a cook becomes something of a surrogate father for the little girl whose family he serves. “Hieronymous (Hi RON-EE-moose) Bosch, Touched by the Devil” is a documentary about the early Dutch painter.

Comments are closed.