When you wanna laugh, who you gonna call? Guess what, all you misogynistic Internet trolls who were certain that an all-female version of “Ghostbusters” would be a disastrous rip-off. The new “Ghostbusters” is actually good, goofy fun.

Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones have teamed with “Bridesmaids” director Paul Feig for a whimsical if uninspired update of the 1984 hit. What the original “Ghostbusters” had going for it was originality and Bill Murray’s spot-on, deadpan performance. This new version lacks both. Still, the reboot has energy to spare and an infectious, playful attitude that fits the original’s template. I ain’t afraid of no remakes.

Bryan Cranston, the infamous meth dealer from “Breaking Bad,” moves to the other side of the war on drugs with “The Infiltrator.” Cranston is terrific in the true story of a U.S. Customs agent who posed as a money launderer in order to infiltrate a drug cartel in the 1980s.

Cranston’s performance has depth and he’s surrounded by a sharp supporting cast. The film has a gritty, realistic feel but is violent enough to be off-putting to some. The downside is this thriller’s deliberate pace, which prevents it from being quite as riveting as it should have been.

“The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble” is an involving documentary about the renowned cellist and the diverse group of international musicians he assembled in an attempt to expand musical horizons and build cultural bridges. There’s a lot of chattiness, but when the music plays, it soars.

“Weiner-Dog” is the latest pitch black comedy from eccentric indie filmmaker Todd Solondz, about dachshund’s series of clueless owners. It’s very smart and well acted by a first-rate cast…but its ultra bleak worldview makes for a very depressing hour and a half.

ON Freeze Frame | July 15, 2016 | Noon on "Arts Magazine"

FREEZE FRAME: “Ghostbusters,” “The Infiltrator,” “The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble,” “Weiner-Dog”

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When you wanna laugh, who you gonna call? Guess what, all you misogynistic Internet trolls who were certain that an all-female version of “Ghostbusters” would be a disastrous rip-off. The new “Ghostbusters” is actually good, goofy fun.

Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones have teamed with “Bridesmaids” director Paul Feig for a whimsical if uninspired update of the 1984 hit. What the original “Ghostbusters” had going for it was originality and Bill Murray’s spot-on, deadpan performance. This new version lacks both. Still, the reboot has energy to spare and an infectious, playful attitude that fits the original’s template. I ain’t afraid of no remakes.

Bryan Cranston, the infamous meth dealer from “Breaking Bad,” moves to the other side of the war on drugs with “The Infiltrator.” Cranston is terrific in the true story of a U.S. Customs agent who posed as a money launderer in order to infiltrate a drug cartel in the 1980s.

Cranston’s performance has depth and he’s surrounded by a sharp supporting cast. The film has a gritty, realistic feel but is violent enough to be off-putting to some. The downside is this thriller’s deliberate pace, which prevents it from being quite as riveting as it should have been.

“The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble” is an involving documentary about the renowned cellist and the diverse group of international musicians he assembled in an attempt to expand musical horizons and build cultural bridges. There’s a lot of chattiness, but when the music plays, it soars.

“Weiner-Dog” is the latest pitch black comedy from eccentric indie filmmaker Todd Solondz, about dachshund’s series of clueless owners. It’s very smart and well acted by a first-rate cast…but its ultra bleak worldview makes for a very depressing hour and a half.

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