If you’re looking for frenetic action, car chases and general paranoid mayhem then look no further than “Jason Bourne.” Matt Damon returns for the fourth time as Robert Ludlum’s CIA super assassin seeking revenge against those who stole his identity. Director Paul Greengrass’ herky-jerky camera style gets a bit tedious at times and the whole enterprise seems all too familiar, but most fans will get exactly the cinematic chaos they expect.

No, “Captain Fantastic” isn’t the latest Marvel superhero flick. Viggo Mortensen of the “Lord of the Rings” fame stars in this offbeat story of a man who attempts to raise his six children completely ‘off-the-grid.’ They’re home schooled, hunt and raise their own food and have minimal contact with the rest of the world. When his wife dies, her family tries to wrest the children away from him. Writer/director Matt Ross’s anti-materialistic opus is a sweet natured and involving comic drama illustrating both the pros and cons if this unusual parenting approach.

Emma Roberts and Dave Franco star in the effective little thriller “Nerve” about teens who get a lot more than they can handle when they sign up for a cyber dare game. It stretches credibility to the limit, but deserves extra credit for having some genuinely original ideas.

“Café Society” is a glossy new Woody Allen’s flick set during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg star in this romantic comic drama that plows no new ground, but provides a pleasant look back through rose-colored glasses.

The title tells all in “Bad Moms,” a raunchy, foul-mouthed comedy starring Mila Kunis and Kristen Bell. Like so many contemporary comedies, it substitutes vulgarity for wit. Thanks to a game and gifted cast, it generates a few brazen laughs, but not enough for a feature-length movie.

ON Freeze Frame | July 29, 2016 | Noon on "Arts Magazine"

FREEZE FRAME: “Jason Bourne,” “Captain Fantastic,” “Nerve,” “Cafe Society”

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If you’re looking for frenetic action, car chases and general paranoid mayhem then look no further than “Jason Bourne.” Matt Damon returns for the fourth time as Robert Ludlum’s CIA super assassin seeking revenge against those who stole his identity. Director Paul Greengrass’ herky-jerky camera style gets a bit tedious at times and the whole enterprise seems all too familiar, but most fans will get exactly the cinematic chaos they expect.

No, “Captain Fantastic” isn’t the latest Marvel superhero flick. Viggo Mortensen of the “Lord of the Rings” fame stars in this offbeat story of a man who attempts to raise his six children completely ‘off-the-grid.’ They’re home schooled, hunt and raise their own food and have minimal contact with the rest of the world. When his wife dies, her family tries to wrest the children away from him. Writer/director Matt Ross’s anti-materialistic opus is a sweet natured and involving comic drama illustrating both the pros and cons if this unusual parenting approach.

Emma Roberts and Dave Franco star in the effective little thriller “Nerve” about teens who get a lot more than they can handle when they sign up for a cyber dare game. It stretches credibility to the limit, but deserves extra credit for having some genuinely original ideas.

“Café Society” is a glossy new Woody Allen’s flick set during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg star in this romantic comic drama that plows no new ground, but provides a pleasant look back through rose-colored glasses.

The title tells all in “Bad Moms,” a raunchy, foul-mouthed comedy starring Mila Kunis and Kristen Bell. Like so many contemporary comedies, it substitutes vulgarity for wit. Thanks to a game and gifted cast, it generates a few brazen laughs, but not enough for a feature-length movie.

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