Don’t want the government to mingle with religion? You’re probably a secularist – and don’t even know it.

If you want to wear a hijab in public, keep prayer out of public schools, or practice any religion as you please, you’re probably a secularist. So says Jacques Berlinerblau, who reminds us that embracing secularism doesn’t have to mean shunning religion.
Jacques Berlinerblau, author of “How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom

and…
Religious pluralism is hard to pull off. But Eboo Patel is doing his best to make it a reality in American society – especially in this time of growing intolerance for Muslims and other religious minorities.
Eboo Patel, creator of the Interfaith Youth Core and author of “Sacred Ground: Pluralism, Prejudice, and the Promise of America“, also… 

Jews have been celebrating the joyous harvest holiday of Sukkot for thousands of years. Many build a hut, called a sukkah, where they invite friends and family for festive meals. The roofs are made of branches, open to the sky, recalling a vulnerability that is as relevant now as when the Jews were wandering in the desert.
Rabbi Roni Handler, editor at Ritualwell

 

 

ON Interfaith Voices | October 9, 2012 | 12:00 pm

How (and Why) to be Secular, Celebrating Sukkot, and More

Don’t want the government to mingle with religion? You’re probably a secularist – and don’t even know it.

If you want to wear a hijab in public, keep prayer out of public schools, or practice any religion as you please, you’re probably a secularist. So says Jacques Berlinerblau, who reminds us that embracing secularism doesn’t have to mean shunning religion.
Jacques Berlinerblau, author of “How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom

and…
Religious pluralism is hard to pull off. But Eboo Patel is doing his best to make it a reality in American society – especially in this time of growing intolerance for Muslims and other religious minorities.
Eboo Patel, creator of the Interfaith Youth Core and author of “Sacred Ground: Pluralism, Prejudice, and the Promise of America“, also… 

Jews have been celebrating the joyous harvest holiday of Sukkot for thousands of years. Many build a hut, called a sukkah, where they invite friends and family for festive meals. The roofs are made of branches, open to the sky, recalling a vulnerability that is as relevant now as when the Jews were wandering in the desert.
Rabbi Roni Handler, editor at Ritualwell

 

 

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