This week on Interfaith Voices:

The Short Road to Sainthood for Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII

Sainthood is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval for the Catholic Church; it means a person has led a holy life and is now worthy of devotion by the faithful. The vetting process is a lengthy one, though Pope Francis let a few requirements slide for the church’s newest saints, Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII. This week we find out why the Catholic Church still needs saints, and we take a closer look at the the supernatural side of the canonization process–finding proof of two miracles.

Francis Rooney: Ambassador to the Vatican

In 1984, the U.S. government began sending an ambassador to a different kind of place– the Vatican. It’s known in diplomatic lingo as the Holy See, and it’s considered a sovereign entity, with its own bank, its own bureaucracy and its own postal code. Ambassador Francis Rooney, the U.S. representative to the Vatican under George W. Bush, joins us to talk about why our country needs a strategic link with the Catholic Church.

Merging Meditation with the Marketplace

At the University of California at Berkeley, beginning economics students were frustrated with some of the basic assumptions behind Econ 1: more is always better, an extra dollar of income is the same whether you make $10,000 or $1 million, transactions don’t have external consequences. One professor decided it was time for a change. In the spring 2014 semester, Claire Brown offered a course called “Buddhist Economics,” which infuses the dismal science with a sense of morality.

Featured speakers/guests:

Jim Martin, SJ, editor-at-large of America Magazine and author of Jesus: A Pilgrimage


Mitch Horowitz,
editor-in-chief at Tarcher/Penguin and author of One Simple Idea: How Positive Thinking Reshaped Modern Life

Ambassador Francis Rooney, author of The Global Vatican

Clair Brown, professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley

 

 

ON Interfaith Voices | April 29, 2014 | 12:00 pm

How to Become a Catholic Saint, Buddhism Meets Econ 101, and More

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/535ab1519a737web_1417_sainthood___simon_ushakov___1685_credit_public_domain-wpcf_123x100.jpg

This week on Interfaith Voices:

The Short Road to Sainthood for Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII

Sainthood is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval for the Catholic Church; it means a person has led a holy life and is now worthy of devotion by the faithful. The vetting process is a lengthy one, though Pope Francis let a few requirements slide for the church’s newest saints, Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII. This week we find out why the Catholic Church still needs saints, and we take a closer look at the the supernatural side of the canonization process–finding proof of two miracles.

Francis Rooney: Ambassador to the Vatican

In 1984, the U.S. government began sending an ambassador to a different kind of place– the Vatican. It’s known in diplomatic lingo as the Holy See, and it’s considered a sovereign entity, with its own bank, its own bureaucracy and its own postal code. Ambassador Francis Rooney, the U.S. representative to the Vatican under George W. Bush, joins us to talk about why our country needs a strategic link with the Catholic Church.

Merging Meditation with the Marketplace

At the University of California at Berkeley, beginning economics students were frustrated with some of the basic assumptions behind Econ 1: more is always better, an extra dollar of income is the same whether you make $10,000 or $1 million, transactions don’t have external consequences. One professor decided it was time for a change. In the spring 2014 semester, Claire Brown offered a course called “Buddhist Economics,” which infuses the dismal science with a sense of morality.

Featured speakers/guests:

Jim Martin, SJ, editor-at-large of America Magazine and author of Jesus: A Pilgrimage


Mitch Horowitz,
editor-in-chief at Tarcher/Penguin and author of One Simple Idea: How Positive Thinking Reshaped Modern Life

Ambassador Francis Rooney, author of The Global Vatican

Clair Brown, professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley

 

 

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