Jane Kaczmarek and Susan Sullivan head the cast when L.A. Theatre Works records Diane Samuels’ play for public radio broadcast. In the final months leading up to World War II, 10,000 Jewish children were sent by their parents to the UK to escape the Nazi concentration camps. Most never saw their parents again. Kindertransport celebrates the heroism and hope that kept these children alive.

Jane Kaczmarek (Malcolm in the Middle), reprising the role she created for the U.S premiere at the Manhattan Theatre Club and for which she won an Ovation Award in the L.A. premiere, and Susan Sullivan (Dharma and Greg, Castle) head the cast when L.A. Theatre Works records Diane Samuels’ play for public radio broadcast.

In the final months leading up to World War II, 10,000 Jewish children were voluntarily sent by their parents to the UK to escape the certain death of Nazi concentration camps. Most never saw their parents again. Kindertransport celebrates the heroism and hope that kept these children alive.

ON L.A. Theatre Works | November 20, 2013 | 7:00 pm

Kindertransport

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/gmwrv-635053543768571604-wpcf_150x100.jpg

Jane Kaczmarek and Susan Sullivan head the cast when L.A. Theatre Works records Diane Samuels’ play for public radio broadcast. In the final months leading up to World War II, 10,000 Jewish children were sent by their parents to the UK to escape the Nazi concentration camps. Most never saw their parents again. Kindertransport celebrates the heroism and hope that kept these children alive.

Jane Kaczmarek (Malcolm in the Middle), reprising the role she created for the U.S premiere at the Manhattan Theatre Club and for which she won an Ovation Award in the L.A. premiere, and Susan Sullivan (Dharma and Greg, Castle) head the cast when L.A. Theatre Works records Diane Samuels’ play for public radio broadcast.

In the final months leading up to World War II, 10,000 Jewish children were voluntarily sent by their parents to the UK to escape the certain death of Nazi concentration camps. Most never saw their parents again. Kindertransport celebrates the heroism and hope that kept these children alive.

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