This week, Sprouts presents OutCasting, public radio’s LGBTQ youth program.

Until last year, when the Supreme Court struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), the legal marriages of same-sex couples were not recognized by the US government. This forced tens of thousands of couples to either live in different countries or move outside the US in order to stay together, leaving behind families, friends, jobs, and the lives they’d built. The case of US v. Windsor, decided a year ago this week, changed that; bi-national couples can now legally stay together in the US on an equal basis with opposite-sex binational couples. But lives were uprooted, families torn apart. This episode of OutCasting on Sprouts looks at the changes in the law in the wake of Windsor and tells the story of a family that has been affected by DOMA for almost a decade.

Joining us to talk about this issue is Mimi Goodman, whose son Jesse was forced by the anti-gay DOMA to move outside the US in order to stay with his partner, Max Oliva, who was originally from Argentina. Also joining us is Lavi Soloway, a civil rights attorney of the DOMA Project and the law firm of Masliah & Soloway, whose practice focuses on bi-national couples and immigration issues.

Featured Guests

Mimi Goodman, whose son was forced to live outside the US to be with his Argentinian partner; Lavi Soloway, civil rights lawyer.

ON Sprouts | July 3, 2014 | 12:00 pm

Marriage equality as it pertains to bi-national couples

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/marriage-wpcf_250x100.jpg

This week, Sprouts presents OutCasting, public radio’s LGBTQ youth program.

Until last year, when the Supreme Court struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), the legal marriages of same-sex couples were not recognized by the US government. This forced tens of thousands of couples to either live in different countries or move outside the US in order to stay together, leaving behind families, friends, jobs, and the lives they’d built. The case of US v. Windsor, decided a year ago this week, changed that; bi-national couples can now legally stay together in the US on an equal basis with opposite-sex binational couples. But lives were uprooted, families torn apart. This episode of OutCasting on Sprouts looks at the changes in the law in the wake of Windsor and tells the story of a family that has been affected by DOMA for almost a decade.

Joining us to talk about this issue is Mimi Goodman, whose son Jesse was forced by the anti-gay DOMA to move outside the US in order to stay with his partner, Max Oliva, who was originally from Argentina. Also joining us is Lavi Soloway, a civil rights attorney of the DOMA Project and the law firm of Masliah & Soloway, whose practice focuses on bi-national couples and immigration issues.

Featured Guests

Mimi Goodman, whose son was forced to live outside the US to be with his Argentinian partner; Lavi Soloway, civil rights lawyer.

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