Hosted by: Glen Sebera

There is no question that during our lifetime we will inevitably experience times of crises and ultimately loss. Many of us feel powerless over the anxiety and confusion that arises during these times.  According Ronald Alexander, we are actually not powerless over the impact of crisis; we can transform during these times to find more strength, more awareness, and more creativity in our lives through the practice of mindfulness.  This practice was first taught by the Buddha more than 2400 years ago. Alexander suggests that we should “pay attention to our breath in each and every moment… mindfulness was not just something to do on a meditation cushion, but mindfulness is something to work with and apply when we are making tea, farming a field, or when we’re working on our iPad.” He shares his three-part process of bringing more mindfulness into our lives: letting go, tuning in, taking action. He gives concrete examples of highly creative people who use this process. Part of the process is calling a wisdom council of support. These may be people you know, people you admire, even people who have passed away as he helps us see how to mine the core gold of our innate creativity.(hosted by Glen Sebera)

BIO

Ronald Alexander, Ph.S. is a psychotherapist, leadership consultant and clinical trainer. He is the director of the Open Mind Training Institute in Santa Monica, an organization that offers personal and professional training programs on integrative mind/body therapies that combine the wisdom teachings of the East with positive psychology and creative thinking.  He’s a pioneer in the field of somatic psychotherapy, holistic psychology, and leadership coaching, He’s a long time extension faculty member of the UCLA departments of Humanities, Social Science and Entertainment and an adjunct faculty member at Pepperdine University.  He’s the author ofWise Mind, Open Mind, Finding Purpose and Meaning in Times of Crisis, Loss and Change (New Harbinger Publications 2008). To learn more about the work of Ronald Alexander, Ph.D. go to www.ronaldalexander.com.

Topics explored in this dialogue include:

  • Why mindfulness is something we can apply to our daily lives
  • How mindfulness practice can help us manage change, loss, and crisis
  • Where do Eastern and Western psychological and wisdom traditions meet
  • How did the Buddha and Freud differ in their view of the nature of suffering
  • How is mindfulness training similar to Christian contemplation
  • How meditation enhances creativity
  • How meditation doesn’t need to be physically uncomfortable
  • What is the three part process of creating more mindfulness in our lives
  • What is the difference between fool’s gold of creativity and core gold of creativity
  • Why we should gather around us a wisdom council of support

Program Number: 3458

ON New Dimensions | February 5, 2013 | 5:00 am

Navigating Crisis With Mindfulness Practices with Ronald Alexander, Ph.D.

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/ND_Ronald_Alexander2-wpcf_250x100.jpg
Hosted by: Glen Sebera

There is no question that during our lifetime we will inevitably experience times of crises and ultimately loss. Many of us feel powerless over the anxiety and confusion that arises during these times.  According Ronald Alexander, we are actually not powerless over the impact of crisis; we can transform during these times to find more strength, more awareness, and more creativity in our lives through the practice of mindfulness.  This practice was first taught by the Buddha more than 2400 years ago. Alexander suggests that we should “pay attention to our breath in each and every moment… mindfulness was not just something to do on a meditation cushion, but mindfulness is something to work with and apply when we are making tea, farming a field, or when we’re working on our iPad.” He shares his three-part process of bringing more mindfulness into our lives: letting go, tuning in, taking action. He gives concrete examples of highly creative people who use this process. Part of the process is calling a wisdom council of support. These may be people you know, people you admire, even people who have passed away as he helps us see how to mine the core gold of our innate creativity.(hosted by Glen Sebera)

BIO

Ronald Alexander, Ph.S. is a psychotherapist, leadership consultant and clinical trainer. He is the director of the Open Mind Training Institute in Santa Monica, an organization that offers personal and professional training programs on integrative mind/body therapies that combine the wisdom teachings of the East with positive psychology and creative thinking.  He’s a pioneer in the field of somatic psychotherapy, holistic psychology, and leadership coaching, He’s a long time extension faculty member of the UCLA departments of Humanities, Social Science and Entertainment and an adjunct faculty member at Pepperdine University.  He’s the author ofWise Mind, Open Mind, Finding Purpose and Meaning in Times of Crisis, Loss and Change (New Harbinger Publications 2008). To learn more about the work of Ronald Alexander, Ph.D. go to www.ronaldalexander.com.

Topics explored in this dialogue include:

  • Why mindfulness is something we can apply to our daily lives
  • How mindfulness practice can help us manage change, loss, and crisis
  • Where do Eastern and Western psychological and wisdom traditions meet
  • How did the Buddha and Freud differ in their view of the nature of suffering
  • How is mindfulness training similar to Christian contemplation
  • How meditation enhances creativity
  • How meditation doesn’t need to be physically uncomfortable
  • What is the three part process of creating more mindfulness in our lives
  • What is the difference between fool’s gold of creativity and core gold of creativity
  • Why we should gather around us a wisdom council of support

Program Number: 3458

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