Taking it’s cue from Dr. Carter Godwin Goodson, who created Negro History Week in February 1926 to coincide with the Birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, Pacifica Station KPFA in 1962 honored Goodson’s Week with this Special Program.

This program featured a history of blacks on this continent beginning with Columbus, a Folkways recording narrated by famed writer Langston Hughes called The Glory of Negro History

 

In celebration of Black History Month, this show profiles a prominent African American family in Ames, Iowa, a practically all-white Midwestern college town.

Archie and Nancy Martin, born into slavery, left Georgia in 1915 with four grown children and headed for Ames when they were in their sixties. Their sons helped them build a large house on the main thoroughfare.

When the Martins found out that black students at Iowa State College (now Iowa State University) had trouble finding housing, they opened the second floor of their home to boarders. The story of the Martin family provides a snapshot of racism in a small Midwest college town.

ON Thursday Night Special | February 13, 2014 | 7:00 pm

Negro History Week and Black History Month in the Midwest

Taking it’s cue from Dr. Carter Godwin Goodson, who created Negro History Week in February 1926 to coincide with the Birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, Pacifica Station KPFA in 1962 honored Goodson’s Week with this Special Program.

This program featured a history of blacks on this continent beginning with Columbus, a Folkways recording narrated by famed writer Langston Hughes called The Glory of Negro History

 

In celebration of Black History Month, this show profiles a prominent African American family in Ames, Iowa, a practically all-white Midwestern college town.

Archie and Nancy Martin, born into slavery, left Georgia in 1915 with four grown children and headed for Ames when they were in their sixties. Their sons helped them build a large house on the main thoroughfare.

When the Martins found out that black students at Iowa State College (now Iowa State University) had trouble finding housing, they opened the second floor of their home to boarders. The story of the Martin family provides a snapshot of racism in a small Midwest college town.

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