Morning Mixed Box of Musical Treats

Join Host Beth Pike as she once again dips her hand into the proverbial box of musical chocolates and see what “sweet treats” are in store.  Expect to hear from Robbie Robertson, Mike and The Mechanics, Rod Stewart, Trevor Rabin, a little Arlo Guthrie leftovers from Thanksgiving, your Recommended Daily Allowance (RDAR) of Rush and Oh, So Much More.  That’s the Thirsty Thursday Edition of The Morning Buzz on Kansas City Community Radio.  Streaming the broadcast on the web at KKFI.org

“Fire Song” + Queer Parenting + Global LGBT News!

This week on This Way Out:

Two-Spirit romance and indigenous issues ignite “Fire Song”;
Same-gender parents share family secrets; Trump’s cabinet picks shelve LGBT rights, voters end the reign of Gambia’s homophobic Yahya Jammeh, a close U.N. vote saves its newly created LGBT rights watchdog, thousands march for equality with Pride in New Delhi and Hong Kong, South Australia’s premier issues an unprecedented apology, and more LGBT news from around the world!

Featuring:

Jay Weatherill; Adam Garnet Jones. 

Credits:

Hosted this week by Greg Gordon and produced with Lucia Chappelle. NewsWrap reporters: Jessica Andrea & Michael LeBeau; Producer: Steve Pride. Correspondents: Janet Mason; Steve Pride. Theme music: Kim Wilson. Add’l music by Paul Lynde from Bye Bye Birdie; David Brown. Add’l material: Barney Frank; Lucia Chappelle with Sweet Honey in the Rock. 

Oil vs Water: The Dakota Access Pipeline Debate – Another Blue-Green Standoff?

This week on the Heartland Labor Forum, our show is “Oil vs Water: The Dakota Access Pipeline Debate”. Is this another Blue-Green standoff of jobs versus the environment? We’ll look at the issue from both sides as well as how the recent denial of a permit will impact the issue. Thursday at 6pm, rebroadcast Friday at 5am.

Oil vs Water: The Dakota Access Pipeline Debate – Another Blue-Green Standoff?

This week on the Heartland Labor Forum, our show is “Oil vs Water: The Dakota Access Pipeline Debate”. Is this another Blue-Green standoff of jobs versus the environment? We’ll look at the issue from both sides as well as how the recent denial of a permit will impact the issue. Thursday at 6pm, rebroadcast Friday at 5am.

More 1980s plus Wake the Dead

Part 1 20:37
Grateful Dead, Dave’s Picks vol 20 (12/9/81)
US BLUES
(I CAN’T GET NO) SATISFACTION
Wake the Dead, Deal
DARK STAR->
MAIDS OF MICHELSTOWN->
AND YOUR BIRD CAN SING

Part 2 35:36
Grateful Dead 4/16/84 War Memorial Auditorium, Rochester NY
ME AND MY UNCLE->
MEXICALI BLUES
DUPREE’S DIAMOND BLUES
CASSIDY
WEST LA FADEAWAY
MIGHT AS WELL

Responsibility to Protect

Vijay Prashad is professor of international studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. He teaches courses in international law and human rights. He is the author of many books, including Arab Spring, Libyan Winter, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South and The Death of a Nation and the Future of the Arab Revolution.

Following the mass killings in Rwanda and the international communities’ failure to act, the UN formulated a new doctrine called Responsibility to Protect (R2P). Its key provision is “Sovereignty no longer exclusively protects states from foreign interference.” Libya is a perfect example of R2P gone haywire. There were hyperbolic reports of atrocities, bloodbaths and massacres. The U.S. invoked R2P. A UN resolution to protect civilians was passed and its authority almost immediately exceeded. NATO embarked on a heavy bombing campaign. R2P quickly morphed into regime change. Qaddafi was assassinated. Hillary Clinton joked, “We came, we saw, he died.” Cheers could be heard in the corridors of power in the West. Today, Libya is a broken, devastated country. R2P, if it is to be effective and have credibility, cannot be selectively applied. Nor can it be used as a cover for big power intervention.

Program #PRAV001. Recorded in University Park, PA on October 05, 2016.

Louis Perez on Fidel Castro, Craig Aaron on Local Media Auctions

This week on CounterSpin: US corporate media’s Fidel Castro is a cartoon, in death no less than in life. While it’s implied that our only choice is between hagiography and hatred, there is actual history that provides context for understanding the role in world events of Fidel Castro and the Cuban revolution, which involved other people besides him. We’ll hear from Louis Pérez, history professor at the University of North Carolina and author of, among other titles, Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution.

Allen Toussaint: A Saint for All Seasons

We celebrate the songmaker, piano “professor” and producer from New Orleans who passed away suddenly in November, 2015. A beloved Creole gentleman, Allen Toussaint was a hometown hero and giant on the American music scene. He wrote over 800 songs and produced regional and national hit records such as “Java” (Al Hirt), “Mother-in-Law” (Ernie K-Doe), “I Like it Like That” (Chris Kenner), “It’s Raining” (Irma Thomas), “Yes We Can” (Lee Dorsey) among others. Toussaint worked closely with the Meters, Neville Brothers, Dr. John, Paul McCartney and Elvis Costello. He is in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame and received the National Medal of Arts. Allen Toussaint’s famed autobiographical song is “Southern Nights.”