Retro Redeye Pipeline 2: The Resurrectioning

Playlist for 6/27-28/2015:

 

B52S – GIVE ME BACK MY MAN – 10:10PM

B52S – DIRTY BACK ROAD – 10:13

B52S – 6060842 – 10:17

DEVO – BIG MESS – 10:19

DEVO – THAT’S GOOD – 10:22

THE FEELIES – THE BOY WITH PERPETUAL NERVOUSNESS – 10:27

GLASS CANDY – DIGITAL VERSICOLOR – 10:32

BALLET SCHOOL – JADE – 10:38

WILD NOTHING – ONLY HEATHER – 10:45

WILD NOTHING – NOCTURNE – 10:48

NOW NOW – THREAD – 10:53

COCTEAU TWINS – CHERRY COLOURED FUNK – 10:57

AIRIEL – IN YOUR ROOM – 11:03

LUSH – LOVELIFE – 11:12

PURE X – TWISTED MIRROR – 11:16

BOWERY ELECTRIC – FEAR OF FLYING – 11:22

THE TELESCOPES – FLYING – 11:25

THE VERVE – NORTHER SOUL – 11:30

LIVES OF ANGELS – IN THE IMAGE OF YOUTH – 11:36

BLONDE REDHEAD – 23 – 11:39

INTERPOL – STELLA WAS A DIVER AND SHE WAS ALWAYS DOWN – 11:44

TRENTEMOLLER – VAMP – 11:50

LSD & THE SEARCH FOR GOD – I DON’T CARE – 11:55

MY BLOODY VALENTINE – WHO SEES YOU – 12:00AM

ANIKA – MASTERS OF WAR – 12:05

DAS ICH – ZWEISAMKEIT – 12:19

ENDRAUM – TRAUMSTAUB – 12:24

XMAL DEUTSCHLAND – MOND LICHT – 12:29

KRAFTWERK – TRANS EUROPE EXPRESS – 12:33

BAUHAUS – IN THE FLAT FIELD – 12:38

DAVID BOWIE – QUEEN BITCH – 12:47

PSYCHEDELIC FURS – MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT – 12:49

TUBEWAY ARMY – PRAYING TO THE ALIENS – 12:53

GARY NUMAN – FILMS – 12:57

CHAPTERHOUSE – SOMETHING MORE – 1:01

GALAXIE 500 – INSTRUMENTAL – 1:09

MOSCOW OLYMPICS – WHAT IS LEFT UNSAID – 1:12

JESUS & MARY CHAIN – NEVER UNDERSTAND – 1:16

JOY DIVISION – LOVE WILL TEAR US APART – 1:19

DAVID BOWIE – REBEL REBEL – 1:22

LIGHT ASYLUM – DARK ALLIES – 1:28

SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES – CITIES IN DUST – 1:33

CLAN OF XYMOX – OBSESSION – 1:39

COLD CAVE – LITTLE DEATH TO LAUGH – 1:43

NEW ORDER – TRUE FAITH – 1:44

MOTT THE HOOPLE – ALL THE YOUNG DUDES – 1:52

PUBLIC IMAGE LTD – ANOTHER – 1:55

ELEVEN POND – WATCHING TREES – 2:00

BAUHAUS – SHE IN PARTIES – 2:05

ASSEMBLAGE 23 – LONGEVITY – 2:09

SISTERS OF MERCY – LUCRETIA – 2:19

THE CHAMELEONS – UP THE DOWN ESCALATOR – 2:23

TEARS FOR FEARS – MAD WORLD – 2:27

PHANTOGRAM – CELEBRATING NOTHING – 2:30

AIR – MER DU JAPON – 2:34

BIG BLACK DELTA – HUGGIN AND KISSIN – 2:37

TURZI – A – 2:41

THE AVALANCHES – ETOH – 2:44

NEON INDIAN – TERMINALLY CHILL – 2:51

TORO Y MOI – NEW BEAT – 2:55

SAINT PEPSI – JUST BEGUN – 3:00

STRFKR – GOLDEN LIGHT – 3:02

POND – ALLERGIES – 3:06

TWIN PEAKS – NATURAL VILLAIN – 3:10

ASPECTS OF PHYSICS – LEVEL 4.2 – 3:13

APHEX TWIN – CURTAINS – 3:30

WHITE RAINBOW – AWAKENING – 3:39

TIM HECKER – STAGS, AIRCRAFT, KINGS & SECRETARIES – 3:48

DAFT PUNK – CONTACT – 3:53

Live in Kansas City

Mike Murphy was out and about over the weekend recording live music in Kansas City.  Streetlevel Uprising played at Awaze Friday night, and Volkerfest was Saturday.  We’ll hear some of those recordings.

A Tribute to Chris Squire and Potlicker’s Possum Run

Legendary Yes bass player and founder, Chris Squire passed away over the weekend.  Mike Murphy pays tribute to him during the first hour, and the Wednesday Morning Buzz concert Series continues with Potlicker’s Possum Run from 7 to 7:30

Anthem of the Dog

Part 1 32:20
Grateful Dead 3/1/70 Family Dog on the Great Highway, San Francisco CA
DIRE WOLF
GOOD LOVIN’->
CUMBERLAND BLUES
KING BEE

Part 2 23:35
Grateful Dead, Anthem of the Sun
ALLIGATOR->
CAUTION (DO NOT STOP ON TRACKS)

Travis Dixon on ‘Terrorism’ Labels, Seth Freed Wessler on Immigration Prison Uprising

MP3 Link

This week on CounterSpin: Confederate flags may be coming down in Southern states, but it’s still an open question how much the white supremacist murders in Charleston will re-orient media discourse. One part of a conversation with many parts has to do with when journalists choose to unleash the weaponized language of “terrorism”—and the effect that has on public opinion and policy. There’s research to illustrate media patterns on the issue, including a report out of the University of Illinois. We’ll speak with lead author, Travis Dixon, associate professor of communication at the University of Illinois/Urbana.

 

Willacy Prison Riot (image: KGBT Action 4 News/The Nation)Also on the show: When an uprising broke out at a Texas prison earlier this year, media accounts said complaints about medical care turned violent at the facility, which overwhelmingly housed immigrants charged with “illegal reentry.” Investigation suggests media didn’t get the story right, though—not too surprising, given the general lack of attention to US prisons and the people in them. We’ll talk about the Texas story, and the bigger story of using prison to address immigration, with journalist Seth Freed Wessler.

LINKS:

  • “Study: Media Quicker to Label Muslims Than Whites as Terrorists,” by Julie Wurth (News-Gazette, 6/23/15)
  • “The Changing Misrepresentation of Race and Crime on Network and Cable News,” by Travis L. Dixon and Charlotte L. Williams (Journal of Communication, 2/15)
  • The True Story of a Texas Prison Riot, by Seth Freed Wessler (The Nation, 6/23/15)

Religion’s Role in the Climate Crisis and The Push to Forgive in the Black Church

Beyond the Encyclical: An Interfaith Panel on the Environment

The Pope’s official plea to save a planet that was “here before us” goes way beyond the Catholic Church. This week, we talk to Muslim, a rabbi and an Episcopal priest about the growing role people of faith are playing in solving the climate crisis. And we confront a passage in the Bible that has long troubled environmentalists: the idea from Genesis that  humans have “dominion over….all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.”   With guests Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb, Chair of the Coalition on the Environment and Jewish Life, Colin Christopher, Executive director of Green Muslims, Kim Lawton, Managing editor of  Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly on public television and Rev. Sally Bingham, Episcopal priest and the founder of Interfaith Power and Light.

Offering Forgiveness while Seeking Justice in Charleston

Many of us were stunned to see relatives of the victims shot down in a Charleston church offer forgiveness to the alleged killer. But for members of the black church, their words of mercy and absolution came as no surprise. We’ll find out why the push to forgive has long been a core value in a church marked by suffering. And we’ll explore the history of slavery, rebellion and freedom at the site of the shooting, the historic Emanuel AME Church.  Featuring Kelly Brown Douglas, author of Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God and Maurie McInnis,  author of The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston.

 

Founding Fathers: Government Cheese, Webb Wilder, Bill Lloyd, and William Hodges

by Craig Havighurst, Music City Roots producer

Whenever you arrive in Nashville to settle down, you’ll meet people who’ll try to convince you that you got here a little too late. You think this is cool, they’ll say, too bad you just missed this or that golden age. For a mid-90s immigrant like myself, those stories often centered on Music City’s first substantial wave of rock and roll in the 1980s. It a little hard to believe. Before I arrived, I was like many Americans who saw Nashville, via TNN and the image of Opryland, as an ersatz Disney full of pink satin and big hair. It’s no surprise I guess that would inspire a punky rebellion, but alas I missed it. I never saw Jason and the Scorchers or the White Animals back in the day at the Exit/In or Springwater or long-gone Cantrell’s. But with time, as I’ve seen the city shake off the “curse” that seemed to keep Nashville rockers limited to regional success, I’ve come to appreciate this chapter of history.

The story might have been relegated to fading memories, but some years ago The Nashville Scene devoted its cover and several thousand words to the story “Hot Bands, Big Deals, A Buzzing Music Scene.” Through testimony from those who were there as artists, club owners, journalists and managers, Tracy Moore chronicled the key bands and venues while drawing a line from that homegrown situation to the breakout bands of the 2000s, such as Paramore and Kings of Leon.

“In some ways, the city’s rock scene is still standing on a platform built in the 1980s,” Moore wrote in conclusion. “Look at similar scenes that flared briefly in the years since—at Lucy’s Record Shop in the early ’90s, at Spongebath Records in Murfreesboro a few years later—and you see a replay of the same cycle, from the initial groundswell to the eventual fade. Look at the current scene, and you find plenty of pivotal figures who cut their teeth almost two decades ago.”

Quite a few of those pivotal figures are set to play this week’s special edition of Roots. In fact every one of our hand-picked leaders – Bill Lloyd, Webb Wilder, Warner Hodges and Government Cheese – is named in the story. They were there at the creation and they did the creating. From time to time, we revel in assembling a show dedicated to a movement or an era, and this one is particularly potent.

Government Cheese (has there ever been a cheekier, better band name?) is the big story of the night because it’s a reunion and a celebration of sensational new music. Our closest tie to the band is Nashville renaissance rocker and MCR regular Tommy Womack, and the last time he did a reunion band show at Roots (The Bis-quits in 2013) it was epic. This evening brings together a five-piece that Bill Lloyd described to Peter Cooper once as “a band of brothers” and that Cooper described as “an energetic and intriguing, Kentucky-warped composite of the Scorchers’ revved-up rock and R.E.M.’s elliptical pop.” That and more is present on the new album The Late Show. Holy cats it’s good, with a fireworks display of bracing riffs, sunny melodies and witty, snarky lyrics. “Beyond the radio wall, there’s music,” they sing in a particularly reveling track. Happily, thanks to Hippie 94.5 FM there will be this great music on the radio on Wednesday.

Opening the night will be Webb Wilder, and of the many things about Webb I love, the thing I’d pay thousands for is his speaking voice. I think my broadcasting career would really take off if I just had his sonorous, Southern baritone. In fact Webb himself has been a DJ and radio host. But that’s just one of many roles he’s played in American culture, from film to stage to the songwriting realm. He came to town from Hattiesburg, MS by way of Austin and helped shape the sound of the 80s with his pal Bobby R.S. Field and their band The Beatnecks. Shades of Buddy Holly, Carl Perkins, Elvis Costello, The Kinks and more have influenced the Webb Wilder vibe, yet his sense of humor sets him apart as an American original. Scott Willis of Government Cheese had this fresh testimony to The Last of the Full Grown Men just last week on Facebook: “I saw Webb Wilder at his sold out solo show in (Bowling Green) last night. The guy is the definition of tight. He puts on an incredible show and he is funny as hell.”

In a slightly more cerebral vein comes Bill Lloyd, high lord of power pop and 80s country radio revolutionary with his surprising hit duo Foster & Lloyd. I sketched Bill’s impressive resume for a featured performance at Roots in 2012 thusly: “Sideman and collaborator with rock royalty like Cheap Trick, Marshall Crenshaw and Ray Davies; songwriter with work recorded by Trisha Yearwood, Martina McBride and others; former curator of stringed instruments at the Country Music Hall of Fame and creator of its long-running “Nashville Cats” series; founder and leader of the wildly popular Long Players (Nashville’s full-album cover band) AND long-running solo pop/rock cult icon.” He’s got a new project, a fascinating re-furbished special edition of his classic solo album Set To Pop on its 20th anniversary. The new album is entitled Re-Set2014, spelled just like that. We’re sure to hear some classic material, played as well as it’s ever been done.

There’s no doubt that Jason & The Scorchers were the biggest and most attention-getting band of Nashville’s rock scare in the 80s. And while frontman Jason Ringenberg delivered the slurry, down-home, fire-breathing vocals, the band would never have launched without a great rock and roll guitarist. Warner E. Hodges was the man, generating curtains of sound and creating vortices on stage with his Tasmanian Devil spins. The Scorchers still tour now and then, but Warner’s current busy-making comes from working with Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ as well his old friend Dan Baird. Hodges found time to cut a rare solo album of unmitigated rock and roll called Gunslinger, which came out late last year. We can’t wait to see what he has in store.

The truth is these are not Nashville rockers from before my time or anybody’s time. They’re Nashville’s best rockers of now. There are more bands rocking Music City today, but these guys’ experience gives them the edge. They’re our Stones and our Clash and our Cheap Trick and we’re happy to share them with the world, should the world get enough of a clue to tune in. Peter Cooper will guest host this show, and that’s perfect because he’s been studying and championing this crew since they emerged, and he’s been uniquely responsible for shaping my appreciation of these particular Nashville cats. Cats who happen to be some of modern Nashville’s Founding Fathers.

Beth Hart

Our guest this week on Art of the Song is Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter, Beth Hart. She is a chart-topping hit-maker, collaborator with guitar legend, Joe Bonamassa, and performer to sold out audiences across the US and Europe. In spite of her success, Beth has been dealing with demons that have pursued her for her whole life: the tragic death of a sister, and her own battle with drugs, booze, bad relationships, and a diagnosis with bi-polar disorder. Perhaps it has been coming to terms with these challenges that has elevated her music to a new level. Beth Hart’s recent release, Better Than Home, is by many accounts her best work to date. It goes to the depth of her soul, revealing past pain, family issues and personal demons as well as her coming to grips with them and using that knowledge to find the real beauty in her life.