Pioneer Women: UAW 31’s Vicky Hale and Adjunct Professors Organize

This week on the Heartland Labor Forum: Meet Vicky Hale – the new President at UAW Local 31. As their first ever woman Prez, she’s a Pioneer Woman. Last week, adjunct professors raised hell along with fast food and other low wage workers. Find out why they’ve become the sweatshop workers of 21st century higher ed. Tune in Thursday at 6pm, rebroadcast Friday at 5am.

Pioneer Women: UAW 31’s Vicky Hale and Adjunct Professors Organize

This week on the Heartland Labor Forum: Meet Vicky Hale – the new President at UAW Local 31. As their first ever woman Prez, she’s a Pioneer Woman. Last week, adjunct professors raised hell along with fast food and other low wage workers. Find out why they’ve become the sweatshop workers of 21st century higher ed. Tune in Thursday at 6pm, rebroadcast Friday at 5am.

European Blues & Memphis Soul Stew

The first 90 minutes will be some new European Blues that i brought back from my Brussels Visit!Some of the artist are:
Erja Lyytinen- Finland,
A Contra Blues – Spain
Jessy Martens & Band- Germany
Lisa Lystam Family Band- Sweden
Shapeshifted- Belgium
and a host of others! This should get you ready for next week “European Blues Challenge ” 3 hour special!!!!!
THe second 90 minutes will be Memphis “Soul Stew” !!!
That’s music made a special way:
Give me about a half a teacup of bassNow I need a pound of fatback drums

Now give me four tablespoons of boiling Memphis guitars
This goin’ taste alright

Now just a little pinch of organ

Now give me a half a pint of horn

Place on the burner and bring to a boil
That’s it, that’s it, that’s it right there.
Now beat, well.
King Curtis

 

Gender Based Violence in Myanmar

A Canadian living in Yangon, Myanmar [formerly Burma] probes deeply into what people say, think, and do about Gender Based Violence in a country that has a mythology of equality and a reality of subordination.

Featured Guest: Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, opposition leader and National League For Democracy Chairperson; Daw Myat Myat Ohn Khin, Minister for Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement; Ma Aye Aye Maw, Economics and English teache; Ko Kyaw Min San, male Taxi Driver; Daw Katha Htery, Buddhist nun; Daw Myint Myint Khin, Boarding house owner. Most of these women are involved with the group Akhaya Women.

Saving the Planet at the Planetary Defense Conference + Sierra Club Radio: Lessons of Love Canal

Planetary Radio Live was the only public event at the just-completed Planetary Defense Conference in Italy. Join us for excerpts from an all-star celebration of worldwide efforts to find, track, characterize and eventually deflect killer Near-Earth Objects. Our guests are William Ailor, Fabrizio Bernardi, Paul Chodas, Lindley Johnson, Detlef Koschny and Amy Mainzer. Bruce Betts was on hand for an on stage What s Up segment and award of the latest round of Shoemaker NEO grants. 

Sierra Club Radio talks with Gibbs, whose work in Love Canal in the 1970′s sparked a movement to clean up toxic waste. She talks with us about creative tactics in activism; what gives her hope; and her work now as Executive Director of the Center for Health, Environment, and Justice. 
Also some Green Tips from Avital Andrews on how to make your drive greener.  

LOCAL SHOWCASE presents Vi Tran’s THE BUTCHER’S SON

Vi Tran presents
THE BUTCHER’S SON
A Refugee Performance Memoir
Performed live on KKFI 90.1 FM
Tune in or stream at www.kkfi.org
8:00 p.m., April 23, 2015

Vi Tran–utilizing drama, spoken word, slam poetry, and folk music–chronicles his family’s escape from Vietnam, through Khmer Rouge-controlled Cambodia, the refugee camps of Thailand and The Philippines, to their eventual arrival and new life in America. Tune in to experience a moving tale of perseverance, love, and hope.

Directed by Mackenzie Goodwin
Featuring Vi Tran, Ai Vy Bui, Erika Crane Ricketts, and Ben Byard

Live theatrical performances at The Buffalo Room on select dates from April 30 – May 11. Stay tuned for more information!
POSTS

Stand Up KC Rally Retrospect

This week on Tell Somebody, Tom Klammer takes a look (and listen!) back at last week’s historic Fight For $15 and Good Jobs For All rally, the largest one in Kansas City yet, which was attended by nearly 2,000 and included speeches from Mayor Sly James in support of $15 and a union. If you were there, be prepared to get re-energized! All this and more on Tell Somebody, Thursdays at 9AM.

Speaking Turkish: Denying the Armenian Genocide

To commemorate this, the first genocide of the 20th century, Law and Disorder co-host Heidi Boghosian presents a 60-minute documentary special titled “Speaking Turkish: Denying the Armenian Genocide.”

Around the world, April 24 marks the observance of the Armenian Genocide. On that day in 1915 the Interior Minister of the Ottoman Empire ordered the arrest and hangings of Armenian intellectuals and community leaders in Constantinople. It was the beginning of a systematic and well-documented plan to eliminate the Armenians, who were Christian, and who had been under Ottoman rule and treated as second class citizens since the 15th century.

The unspeakable and gruesome nature of the killings—beheadings of groups of babies, dismemberments, mass burnings, mass drownings, use of toxic gas, lethal injections of morphine or injections with the blood of typhoid fever patients—render oral histories particularly difficult for survivors of the victims.

Why did this happen? Despite being deemed inferior to Turkish Muslims, the Armenian community had attained a prestigious position in the Ottoman Empire and the central authorities there grew apprehensive of their power and longing for a homeland. The concerted plan of deportation and extermination was effected, in large part, because World War I demanded the involvement and concern of potential allied countries. As the writer Grigoris Balakian wrote, the war provided the Turkish government “their sole opportunity, one unprecedented” to exploit the chaos of war in order to carry out their extermination plan.

As Armenians escaped to several countries, including the United States, a number came to New Britain, Connecticut in 1892 to work in the factories of what was then known as the hardware capital of the world. By 1940 nearly 3,000 Armenians lived there in a tight-knit community.

Pope Frances calls it a duty not to forget “the senseless slaughter” of an estimated one and a half million Armenians by the Ottoman Turks from 1915 to 1923. “Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it,” the Pope said just two weeks before the 100th anniversary of the systematic implementation of a plan to exterminate the Armenian race.

Special thanks to Jennie Garabedian, Arthur Sheverdian, Ruth Swisher, Harry Mazadoorian, and Roxie Maljanian. Produced and written by Heidi Boghosian and Geoff Brady.