This week on Interfaith Voices:

Margot Adler on Paganism and Public Radio

In 1979, Margot Adler became a reporter for NPR. That same year, she wrote Drawing Down the Moon, a book that would become a classic in the pagan world, describing the emerging movement of witches, druids and goddess worshippers with humanity and intelligence. She was both an explainer of the movement and a devout practioner, and one of the first public Wiccan priestesses.

This week, we listen back to our 2008 interview with Adler, in which she reflects on her two roles as a journalist and Wiccan icon. Margot Adler died on July 28th at the age of 68, after battling cancer.

The Legacy of Margot Adler

Margot Adler opened modern paganism to new audiences, and lent it an intellectual credibility and respect that it had not seen before. In a movement that didn’t have elders, she became one, acting as a mentor and source of inspiration for many in the world of earth-based religion. Two guests, including a longtime friend, reflect on the mark she left.

Rajiv Shah’s War On Global Hunger

If religious leaders had a favorite government office, it just might be the The United States Agency for International Development–the USAID. Since its creation in the early 1960s, the office has worked to help the world’s poorest of the poor, giving government aid to countries dealing with major disasters, hunger, disease and more. The head of the USAID joins us in the studio to reflect on how his Hindu faith informs his mission, and to tell us about one of his main priorities: global hunger.

Featured speakers:

Phyllis Curott, Wiccan priestess and former Vice Chair of the Parliament of the World’s Religions
Ronald Hutton, historian of pre-Christian religion, British folklore and modern paganism
Rajiv Shah, administrator of the The United States Agency for International Development
ON Interfaith Voices | August 5, 2014 | 12:00 pm

Remembering Reporter and Priestess Margot Adler, Fighting Extreme Poverty, and More

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/53dc084cc88deweb_1431margot_adler_2004_credit_rob_vincent_wikimedia_commons-wpcf_123x100.jpg

This week on Interfaith Voices:

Margot Adler on Paganism and Public Radio

In 1979, Margot Adler became a reporter for NPR. That same year, she wrote Drawing Down the Moon, a book that would become a classic in the pagan world, describing the emerging movement of witches, druids and goddess worshippers with humanity and intelligence. She was both an explainer of the movement and a devout practioner, and one of the first public Wiccan priestesses.

This week, we listen back to our 2008 interview with Adler, in which she reflects on her two roles as a journalist and Wiccan icon. Margot Adler died on July 28th at the age of 68, after battling cancer.

The Legacy of Margot Adler

Margot Adler opened modern paganism to new audiences, and lent it an intellectual credibility and respect that it had not seen before. In a movement that didn’t have elders, she became one, acting as a mentor and source of inspiration for many in the world of earth-based religion. Two guests, including a longtime friend, reflect on the mark she left.

Rajiv Shah’s War On Global Hunger

If religious leaders had a favorite government office, it just might be the The United States Agency for International Development–the USAID. Since its creation in the early 1960s, the office has worked to help the world’s poorest of the poor, giving government aid to countries dealing with major disasters, hunger, disease and more. The head of the USAID joins us in the studio to reflect on how his Hindu faith informs his mission, and to tell us about one of his main priorities: global hunger.

Featured speakers:

Phyllis Curott, Wiccan priestess and former Vice Chair of the Parliament of the World’s Religions
Ronald Hutton, historian of pre-Christian religion, British folklore and modern paganism
Rajiv Shah, administrator of the The United States Agency for International Development

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