On this week’s edition of Exploration, Sudhir Rajan, author of Suicidal Planet, is on the show to discuss his book and what these issues mean for the human race. Then, Gerald Edelman, Nobel Laureate, speaks about the brain.

About the guests:

Sudhir Chella Rajan is a senior fellow at the Tellus Institute in Boston, where he leads the Global Politics and Institutions Program. He obtained his doctorate in Environmental Science and Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Gerald Maurice Edelman (born July 1, 1929) is an American biologist who shared the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for work with Rodney Robert Porter on the immune system. Edelman’s Nobel Prize-winning research concerned discovery of the structure of antibody molecules.In interviews, he has said that the way the components of the immune system evolve over the life of the individual is analogous to the way the components of the brain evolve in a lifetime. There is a continuity in this way between his work on the immune system, for which he won the Nobel Prize, and his later work in neuroscience and in philosophy of mind.

 

ON Exploration | March 10, 2014 | 5:00 am

“Suicidal Planet” and the Brain

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/rajan-wpcf_183x100.jpg

On this week’s edition of Exploration, Sudhir Rajan, author of Suicidal Planet, is on the show to discuss his book and what these issues mean for the human race. Then, Gerald Edelman, Nobel Laureate, speaks about the brain.

About the guests:

Sudhir Chella Rajan is a senior fellow at the Tellus Institute in Boston, where he leads the Global Politics and Institutions Program. He obtained his doctorate in Environmental Science and Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Gerald Maurice Edelman (born July 1, 1929) is an American biologist who shared the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for work with Rodney Robert Porter on the immune system. Edelman’s Nobel Prize-winning research concerned discovery of the structure of antibody molecules.In interviews, he has said that the way the components of the immune system evolve over the life of the individual is analogous to the way the components of the brain evolve in a lifetime. There is a continuity in this way between his work on the immune system, for which he won the Nobel Prize, and his later work in neuroscience and in philosophy of mind.

 

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