The founder of osteopathic medicine, Andrew Taylor Still, said, “To find health should be the object of the doctor. Anyone can find disease.” The training of osteopathic medicine is identical to that of the M.D. profession. However, an osteopathic physician has up to 500 additional hours of anatomy, manual medicine, and kinesiology. Like M.D.s, these doctors can also prescribe drugs and do surgery. Maud Nerman tells us that what is most important for her is her ability to listen to her patients with awe and respect. She points out that the body’s natural state is to move towards health and her job is to help it do just that. Rather than looking at the body as a mechanistic sort of clockwork, osteopathic physicians are looking at  the body’s interconnectedness, including the flow of fluids throughout the body. She says, “Everyone can learn to be magnificent with touch; it’s the one thing that connects us. That’s what I feel is the gift of osteopathic medicine and anyone can become more trained in manual medicine; it’s natural to all of us.” (hosted by Justine Willis Toms)

Bio

Maud Nerman, D.O. is a physician practicing osteopathic manual medicine, cranial osteopathy and classical homeopathy. A Stanford University graduate, she attended medical school at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She is an adjunct clinical instructor at the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Vallejo, California and has been practicing for over three decades, helping patients recover from injury and addressing complex medical conditions. She lectures throughout the U.S. on osteopathic medicine and regularly teaches advanced courses for medical professionals on the treatment of brain injury and trauma.

She’s the author of:

To learn more about Maud Nerman’s work go to www.healingpainandinjury.com.

Topics explored in this dialogue include:

  • What is osteopathic medicine
  • How does touch and observation help Nerman to diagnose a patient
  • Why is the unobstructed flow of fluids important to health
  • How does Nerman use homeopathy in her practice
  • How the overuse of antibiotics is leading to serious consequences
  • Why doctors have become more and more dependent on medical testing to make a diagnosis and why this may not be optimum
  • How the lymphatic system is our main immune system and how rocking chairs can enhance good health
  • Why getting good sleep is important to good health
  • How good breathing is really important to good health and has been shown to help the immune system

Host: Justine Willis Toms          Interview Date: 3/28/2014          Program Number: 3503

ON New Dimensions | June 24, 2014 | 5:00 am

Tapping Into The Body’s Remarkable Healing Ability with Maud Nerman, D.O.

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/Maud-Nerman-180x180-wpcf_180x100.jpg

The founder of osteopathic medicine, Andrew Taylor Still, said, “To find health should be the object of the doctor. Anyone can find disease.” The training of osteopathic medicine is identical to that of the M.D. profession. However, an osteopathic physician has up to 500 additional hours of anatomy, manual medicine, and kinesiology. Like M.D.s, these doctors can also prescribe drugs and do surgery. Maud Nerman tells us that what is most important for her is her ability to listen to her patients with awe and respect. She points out that the body’s natural state is to move towards health and her job is to help it do just that. Rather than looking at the body as a mechanistic sort of clockwork, osteopathic physicians are looking at  the body’s interconnectedness, including the flow of fluids throughout the body. She says, “Everyone can learn to be magnificent with touch; it’s the one thing that connects us. That’s what I feel is the gift of osteopathic medicine and anyone can become more trained in manual medicine; it’s natural to all of us.” (hosted by Justine Willis Toms)

Bio

Maud Nerman, D.O. is a physician practicing osteopathic manual medicine, cranial osteopathy and classical homeopathy. A Stanford University graduate, she attended medical school at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She is an adjunct clinical instructor at the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Vallejo, California and has been practicing for over three decades, helping patients recover from injury and addressing complex medical conditions. She lectures throughout the U.S. on osteopathic medicine and regularly teaches advanced courses for medical professionals on the treatment of brain injury and trauma.

She’s the author of:

To learn more about Maud Nerman’s work go to www.healingpainandinjury.com.

Topics explored in this dialogue include:

  • What is osteopathic medicine
  • How does touch and observation help Nerman to diagnose a patient
  • Why is the unobstructed flow of fluids important to health
  • How does Nerman use homeopathy in her practice
  • How the overuse of antibiotics is leading to serious consequences
  • Why doctors have become more and more dependent on medical testing to make a diagnosis and why this may not be optimum
  • How the lymphatic system is our main immune system and how rocking chairs can enhance good health
  • Why getting good sleep is important to good health
  • How good breathing is really important to good health and has been shown to help the immune system

Host: Justine Willis Toms          Interview Date: 3/28/2014          Program Number: 3503

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