In Syria, Alawite Muslims are kind of like the Mormons of Christianity: they’re a branch Islam, but many Muslims, especially the Sunni majority, don’t consider them legitimate. That’s always been a problem for Alawite president Bashar al-Assad. Now that at least 17,000 people are dead in a revolt against the Assad regime, we explore why theological differences are playing a huge role. Our interview first aired in March 2012.

Pictured: The old Syrian flag for the Syrian Republic (1932-58) has become a symbol of the revolution, waved by anti-Assad protesters.

Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma

ON Interfaith Voices | August 28, 2012 | 12:00 pm

The Religous Roots of the Syrian Conflict

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/50252f4308c511412_syrian_conflict_credit_flickr_freedomhouse2-wpcf_123x100.jpg

In Syria, Alawite Muslims are kind of like the Mormons of Christianity: they’re a branch Islam, but many Muslims, especially the Sunni majority, don’t consider them legitimate. That’s always been a problem for Alawite president Bashar al-Assad. Now that at least 17,000 people are dead in a revolt against the Assad regime, we explore why theological differences are playing a huge role. Our interview first aired in March 2012.

Pictured: The old Syrian flag for the Syrian Republic (1932-58) has become a symbol of the revolution, waved by anti-Assad protesters.

Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma

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