The Voting Rights Act was passed at the height of America’s civil rights movement. Its present and future are in doubt after the Supreme Court found parts of the Act are no longer valid. Is this decision outrageous or overdue?  Edward Cantu, Associate Professor of Law at University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Law, will discuss the effects and probable outcomes of this decision.

Biography information from UMKC School of Law:

Edward Cantu joined the faculty in 2012 after serving as a Westerfield Fellow at Loyola New Orleans School of Law.

After graduating from the University of Texas School of Law in 2006, he clerked for U.S. District Judge Micaela Alvarez of the Southern District of Texas, then for Jennifer W. Elrod of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Afterwards, he practiced at Sutherland, Asbill & Brennan, LLP, in Houston, where he focused on litigation motion practice and appellate brief writing. More recently, he served as lead counsel in several cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Professor Cantu’s primary teaching areas are constitutional law and civil procedure. His research is generally on these subjects, with a focus also on normative jurisprudence, separation-of-powers and practices in the federal courts that give rise to systemic constitutional problems.

ON All Souls Forum | November 20, 2013 | 12:00 pm

“The Voting Rights Act in the Supreme Court” with Edward Cantu

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The Voting Rights Act was passed at the height of America’s civil rights movement. Its present and future are in doubt after the Supreme Court found parts of the Act are no longer valid. Is this decision outrageous or overdue?  Edward Cantu, Associate Professor of Law at University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Law, will discuss the effects and probable outcomes of this decision.

Biography information from UMKC School of Law:

Edward Cantu joined the faculty in 2012 after serving as a Westerfield Fellow at Loyola New Orleans School of Law.

After graduating from the University of Texas School of Law in 2006, he clerked for U.S. District Judge Micaela Alvarez of the Southern District of Texas, then for Jennifer W. Elrod of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Afterwards, he practiced at Sutherland, Asbill & Brennan, LLP, in Houston, where he focused on litigation motion practice and appellate brief writing. More recently, he served as lead counsel in several cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Professor Cantu’s primary teaching areas are constitutional law and civil procedure. His research is generally on these subjects, with a focus also on normative jurisprudence, separation-of-powers and practices in the federal courts that give rise to systemic constitutional problems.

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