Tim Carroll, a product of rural Indiana, began as the rhythm guitarist for the punk band The Gizmos in the late 70s. He later displayed his bare-bones rock ethic with The Blue Chieftains during the 80s.

A Nashville transplant since 1993, Tim has had songs recorded by John Prine, Asleep At The Wheel, BR-549, Robbie Fulks, Kasey Chambers, Elizabeth Cook, Bare Jr., Sunny Sweeney, Sonny Burgess, and many others.

In 1995, he made the cover of Billboard magazine in an article about Nashville’s burgeoning alt-country music scene. In 1996, Tim was nominated for a Nashville Music Award in the category of “Best Unsigned Artist.” In 1997, he signed a deal with Sire Records and began working with producer Andy Paley.

In 1999, Carroll had two of his Sire recordings on major motion picture soundtracks. Election featured the song “Find A Way To Win,” and Drop Dead Gorgeous includes a song co-written with the late Duane Jarvis, “A Girl That’s Hip.”

Since 2000, Tim has appeared on The Grand Ole Opry literally hundreds of times as sideman to his wife, Americana chanteuse and Sirius Radio host Elizabeth Cook. He’s toured in Japan, Great Britain, France, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Poland, and South Korea.

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.

On a given night (or on a given album) he’ll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He’s a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing ‘em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn’t his ability to copy – it’s his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby “Blue” Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own.

It’s no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad’s extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants.

In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide – with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style.

But Patrick wouldn’t stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed Patrick to form a band.

After 4 critically acclaimed CDs (two produced by longtime collaborator and Grammy award winner Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He’s played clubs and premiere festivals all over the U.S., and supported national acts such as The Black Keys, Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Gourds, The Wood Brothers, and Hot Tuna on tour.

His latest record, Close To The Floor, hit the streets July 16, 2013. It was recorded to 2″ tape in Nasheville, TN and features contributions from Joe McMahan (Luella & The Sun, Allsion Moorer, Webb Wilder), Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Levon Helm), Jon Radford (Justin Townes Earle, Lilly Hiatt), and Ryan Norris (Lambchop), among others. Close To The Floor is a gritty, hard look at some very difficult recent events in Sweany’s life and recalls the halcyon days of Muscle Shoals releases by Dan Penn, Eddie Hinton and Leon Russell.

Named after Ukrainian nomads, Scythian merges Irish, gypsy, and Americana with thunderous energy and technical zest, beckoning crowds into a barn-dance rock concert experience.

Rousing and raucous, Scythian (sith-ee-yin) plays kicked-up Celtic and world music with hints of Gypsy and Klezmer, all infused with a touch of punk-rock sensibility. Take a trio of classically trained dueling fiddlers, toss in a rhythm guitar, a banjo and the occasional funky accordion, then power it with the driving rhythm of a jazz percussionist, and you’ve got the ingredients for a show you won’t soon forget. Scythian’s high-energy, adrenaline-peddling, interactive brand of music is the result of their origins as street performers and has one goal in mind – to get people up on their feet and dancing. Their repertoire ranges from traditional and contemporary Celtic and folk music to the alluring and dramatic strains of Gypsy and Eastern European tunes, and then crosses back over the border to pick up some good old-fashioned bluegrass licks.

Kelsey Waldon is set to release her much-anticipated full-length album titled, The Goldmine, produced by Michael Rinne and Anderson East at Farmland Studios in Nashville, on June 24. This record is the follow up to her critically acclaimed EP titled, Fixin’It Up.

Armed with undeniable talent and an intense love of her craft, Kelsey Waldon is a rare and incredibly refreshing artist; an emerging force of raw, honest, and grounded songwriting in the Nashville music scene.

A Blue Kentucky girl by birth (born in Barlow, KY) having been raised on country classics like Hank Williams, Tom T. Hall, Gram Parsons, Loretta Lynn and countless others, citing them as her hero’s. She’s a student of the craft of songwriting, always taking special care to tell the hard truth and say the needed words. Brian Atkinson from CMT Edge says of Kelsey, “She’s a razor-sharp lyricist and a singular singer with the biggest heart in town.”

Fans of a more traditional style of country music will enjoy Kelsey’s heavy twang and love of moody pedal steel. She is often compared to JessiColter, Caitlin Rose, or a young Loretta – the full spectrum of strong female artists still living with high regard to a well-crafted song. Her music has proven to be accessible to hipsters and traditionalists, both desiring authentic talent that isn’t contrived or put on.

Tim Carroll, Patrick Sweany, Scythian, Kelsey Waldon

http://www.kkfi.org/wp-content/uploads/Keller-Waldon-320.jpg

Tim Carroll, a product of rural Indiana, began as the rhythm guitarist for the punk band The Gizmos in the late 70s. He later displayed his bare-bones rock ethic with The Blue Chieftains during the 80s.

A Nashville transplant since 1993, Tim has had songs recorded by John Prine, Asleep At The Wheel, BR-549, Robbie Fulks, Kasey Chambers, Elizabeth Cook, Bare Jr., Sunny Sweeney, Sonny Burgess, and many others.

In 1995, he made the cover of Billboard magazine in an article about Nashville’s burgeoning alt-country music scene. In 1996, Tim was nominated for a Nashville Music Award in the category of “Best Unsigned Artist.” In 1997, he signed a deal with Sire Records and began working with producer Andy Paley.

In 1999, Carroll had two of his Sire recordings on major motion picture soundtracks. Election featured the song “Find A Way To Win,” and Drop Dead Gorgeous includes a song co-written with the late Duane Jarvis, “A Girl That’s Hip.”

Since 2000, Tim has appeared on The Grand Ole Opry literally hundreds of times as sideman to his wife, Americana chanteuse and Sirius Radio host Elizabeth Cook. He’s toured in Japan, Great Britain, France, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Poland, and South Korea.

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.

On a given night (or on a given album) he’ll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He’s a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing ‘em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn’t his ability to copy – it’s his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby “Blue” Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own.

It’s no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad’s extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants.

In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide – with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style.

But Patrick wouldn’t stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed Patrick to form a band.

After 4 critically acclaimed CDs (two produced by longtime collaborator and Grammy award winner Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He’s played clubs and premiere festivals all over the U.S., and supported national acts such as The Black Keys, Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Gourds, The Wood Brothers, and Hot Tuna on tour.

His latest record, Close To The Floor, hit the streets July 16, 2013. It was recorded to 2″ tape in Nasheville, TN and features contributions from Joe McMahan (Luella & The Sun, Allsion Moorer, Webb Wilder), Ron Eoff (Cate Brothers, Levon Helm), Jon Radford (Justin Townes Earle, Lilly Hiatt), and Ryan Norris (Lambchop), among others. Close To The Floor is a gritty, hard look at some very difficult recent events in Sweany’s life and recalls the halcyon days of Muscle Shoals releases by Dan Penn, Eddie Hinton and Leon Russell.

Named after Ukrainian nomads, Scythian merges Irish, gypsy, and Americana with thunderous energy and technical zest, beckoning crowds into a barn-dance rock concert experience.

Rousing and raucous, Scythian (sith-ee-yin) plays kicked-up Celtic and world music with hints of Gypsy and Klezmer, all infused with a touch of punk-rock sensibility. Take a trio of classically trained dueling fiddlers, toss in a rhythm guitar, a banjo and the occasional funky accordion, then power it with the driving rhythm of a jazz percussionist, and you’ve got the ingredients for a show you won’t soon forget. Scythian’s high-energy, adrenaline-peddling, interactive brand of music is the result of their origins as street performers and has one goal in mind – to get people up on their feet and dancing. Their repertoire ranges from traditional and contemporary Celtic and folk music to the alluring and dramatic strains of Gypsy and Eastern European tunes, and then crosses back over the border to pick up some good old-fashioned bluegrass licks.

Kelsey Waldon is set to release her much-anticipated full-length album titled, The Goldmine, produced by Michael Rinne and Anderson East at Farmland Studios in Nashville, on June 24. This record is the follow up to her critically acclaimed EP titled, Fixin’It Up.

Armed with undeniable talent and an intense love of her craft, Kelsey Waldon is a rare and incredibly refreshing artist; an emerging force of raw, honest, and grounded songwriting in the Nashville music scene.

A Blue Kentucky girl by birth (born in Barlow, KY) having been raised on country classics like Hank Williams, Tom T. Hall, Gram Parsons, Loretta Lynn and countless others, citing them as her hero’s. She’s a student of the craft of songwriting, always taking special care to tell the hard truth and say the needed words. Brian Atkinson from CMT Edge says of Kelsey, “She’s a razor-sharp lyricist and a singular singer with the biggest heart in town.”

Fans of a more traditional style of country music will enjoy Kelsey’s heavy twang and love of moody pedal steel. She is often compared to JessiColter, Caitlin Rose, or a young Loretta – the full spectrum of strong female artists still living with high regard to a well-crafted song. Her music has proven to be accessible to hipsters and traditionalists, both desiring authentic talent that isn’t contrived or put on.

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