Tuesday at 6:30pm

Counterspin

Counterspin is FAIR’s weekly radio show, hosted by Janine Jackson, Steve Rendall and Peter Hart. It’s heard on more than 125 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. Counterspin provides a critical examination of the major stories every week, and exposes what the mainstream media might have missed in their own coverage.

Combining lively discussion and a thoughtful media critique, Counterspin is unlike any other show on the dial. Counterspin exposes and highlights biased and inaccurate news; censored stories; sexism, racism and homophobia in the news; the power of corporate influence; gaffes and goofs by leading TV pundits; TV news’ narrow political spectrum; attacks on free speech; and more.

Upcoming episodes
No Episode found
Recent episodes

Russ Choma on Trump’s Conflicts, Megan Hustings on Food Sharing January 17, 2017 | 6:30pm

The question for the press corps is whether they will keep both feet in reality, or allow the perceived requirement to “include” the Trump camp’s spin “redefine” previous understandings beyond recognition


Read More

Ellen Schrecker on the New McCarthyism January 10, 2017 | 6:30pm

Pretending that fearmongering and watchlists and looking the other way are all newly minted will not serve us. In fact, we can look to history to help us understand what’s happening, and what we can do to resist it.


Read More

Best of CounterSpin 2016 January 3, 2017 | 6:30pm

This year’s “Best Of” includes Heidi Beirich on white supremacy, Chris Savage on Flint’s toxic water, Alvaro Bedoya on discriminatory policing, Brendan DeMelle on Exxon’s climate secrets, Josmar Trujillo on militarized “gang” raids, Shahid Buttar on civilian copwatching, Joe Macare on Brexit, Phyllis Bennis on Trump and the world, and Kelly Hayes on Dakota Access.


Read More

Zorka Milin on Rex Tillerson, Ethan Nadelmann on Trump’s Drug War December 20, 2016 | 6:30pm

A strong contender for most worrisome Trump appointment is making Rex Tillerson, longtime CEO of Exxon Mobil, secretary of State. Plus: Donald Trump looks ready to restart a retrograde, punitive War on Drugs that the country looked to be beginning to shrug off.


Read More

Greg LeRoy on Carrier Deal, Kelly Hayes on What’s Next for #NODAPL December 13, 2016 | 6:30pm

What if instead of getting lost in Trump’s machinations, media looked at what deals like the one that actually happened with Carrier actually wind up meaning for workers and local economies?


Read More

Louis Perez on Fidel Castro, Craig Aaron on Local Media Auctions December 6, 2016 | 6:30pm

While it’s implied that our only choice is between hagiography and hatred, there is actual history that provides context for understanding the role in world events of Fidel Castro and the Cuban revolution, which involved other people besides him.


Read More

Sumi Cho and Alicia Garza on Election and Intersection, James Loewen on Misreporting History November 29, 2016 | 6:30pm

Social justice advocates are getting together to share strategies for protecting vulnerable communities and resisting the predations on our civil rights.


Read More

Kica Matos on Immigration, Sue Udry on Civil Liberties–Under Trump November 22, 2016 | 6:30pm

Donald Trump spent his entire campaign demonizing immigrants as dangerous, job-stealing criminals. While denouncing that, media sometimes dismissed it as mainly campaign rhetoric. Will they take the story seriously enough as a Trump administration tries to turn those ideas into policy?


Read More

What Now? Post-Election Special November 15, 2016 | 6:30pm

What now for electoral reform and congressional diversity? For the environment? For Muslim-Americans and others made vulnerable by the so-called “War on Terror” in its domestic and international fronts?


Read More

Brandi Collins on Black Lives Surveillance November 1, 2016 | 6:30pm

Corporate journalists rely on the First Amendment, but it’s increasingly unclear if the First Amendment can rely on them. The relative lack of interest in the impact of spying on activists—a practice with a long and disturbing history given new power by technology—is the latest example.


Read More

Showing page 1 of 20 Next

Programmer
No programmer(s) found