Tuesday at 6:30pm

Counterspin

Counterspin is FAIR’s weekly radio show, hosted by Janine Jackson, Steve Rendall and Peter Hart. It’s heard on more than 125 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada. Counterspin provides a critical examination of the major stories every week, and exposes what the mainstream media might have missed in their own coverage.

Combining lively discussion and a thoughtful media critique, Counterspin is unlike any other show on the dial. Counterspin exposes and highlights biased and inaccurate news; censored stories; sexism, racism and homophobia in the news; the power of corporate influence; gaffes and goofs by leading TV pundits; TV news’ narrow political spectrum; attacks on free speech; and more.

Upcoming episodes

Phyllis Bennis on Afghanistan Armistice? February 19, 2019 | 6:30pm

Corporate media generally judge the potential for cessation of violence by how it affects US interests; we look at Afghanistan through a different lens.


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Recent episodes

Sarah Aziza on Saudi Repression of Women, Dean Baker on Taxing the Rich
Play
February 12, 2019 | 6:30pm

One would hope that reports that Saudi Arabia under Mohammed bin Salman is torturing women political prisoners would be sufficient to upset the narrative of a “young and brash” reformer.


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Josh Ruebner on BDS Bans, Shankar Narayan on Face Surveillance
Play
February 5, 2019 | 6:30pm

Boycotts are a constitutionally protected form of speech, but Congress and some states are moving to penalize boycotts aimed at territories illegally occupied by Israel.


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Kent Wong on LA Teachers Strike, Rebecca Vallas on the Threat to Medicaid
Play
January 29, 2019 | 6:30pm

Corporate media have been declaring organized labor moribund—sometimes abetting efforts to kill it—for many years now. But more than 30,000 public school teachers in Los Angeles, on strike with overwhelming community support, would suggest you ought not believe everything you read. We’ll hear about the LA teachers strike, and […]


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Debbie Weingarten on the Borderlands, Alexander Main on Maduro’s Reelection
Play
January 15, 2019 | 6:30pm

“Building a wall” at the US/Mexico border is an abstraction for many Americans–but not for people who live in the borderlands, and those who listen to those who do.


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Chip Gibbons on Defending Dissent January 8, 2019 | 6:30pm

Holding on to our ability to speak and to hear one another is just another part of the work we have to do.


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Paul Rosenberg on GOP Power Grabs, Mariana Viturro on Domestic Workers Bill of Rights
Play
December 18, 2018 | 6:30pm

GOP maneuvers reacting to electoral results they don’t like, with overt power grabs that override the express will of voters, define “anti-democratic”—and they rely on a lack of public awareness, abetted by a lack of media sunlight.


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Dave Lindorff on Pentagon Fraud
Play
December 11, 2018 | 6:30pm

It’s not just hard, but impossible, to find out how much the Pentagon spends and on what. Elite media reception of new research in that arena suggests they’d just as soon keep the whole thing under wraps—while reserving their right to entertain complaints about food stamps, however.


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Brian Mier on Brazil’s Election and What Comes Next
Play
December 4, 2018 | 6:30pm

Migrants at the southern border seeking asylum from violence fomented by US policy underscore that we really are one world, interrelated. So how are US readers to understand what’s happening in Brazil and its American flag–saluting, rape joke–making, Hitler-admiring president?


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Felicia Kornbluh on Welfare Reform
Play
November 27, 2018 | 6:30pm

In a different world, welfare policy actually is anti-poverty policy, and is part of a humane social and economic policy that connects health care and housing and income and well-being.


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Ari Berman on the State of Voting 2018, Jackie Prange on Keystone XL Re-Review
Play
November 20, 2018 | 6:30pm

There’s hardly a time more important than elections for media to stop splitting the difference and frankly describe the impact of elections—not just the outcomes, but the processes—on people and their ability to have a say in their circumstances.


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