Noir City Nightclub

Last weekend at the Alamo Drafthouse, the first annual Noir City KC film festival took place.  The event featured a set of classic film noir flicks, entertainers, musicians and cinema noir stars like Peggy Cummins. She is most well known for her performance in Gun Crazy.  The musical entertainment for the evening featured the Laura Ellis, the Latenight Callers and burlesque performer Evie Novelle.

Here’s some images from the nightclub event at the Chesterfield:

Click for more Latenight Callers

 

Click for more Evie Lovelle

 

The entire Noir City group. Click for more.

 

For this and other great local music events, head over to KC Live Music Blog

“Heavenly Father”- Bon Iver

http://scottchernis.wordpress.com/2012/03/13/bon-iver-is-not-a-person/

Though last year’s soaring LP Repave by Volcano Choir essentially acted as a new Bon Iver effort, it’s really been three years since the act Justin Vernon came to fame with has issued anything new. In the run-up to Repave‘s release in September, Vernon expounded on the silence surrounding Bon Iver, saying “I really have to be in a specific headspace to even begin to illuminate an idea that would create another Bon Iver record, and I’m just not there.” At the time his words were effectively a death knell, terrifying fans (myself included) that a follow-up to Bon Iver Bon Iver would never come. Today then is a cause for minor celebration amongst Bon Iver torch-carriers. As previously reported on my AllFreshSounds blog, Bon Iver is contributing a new effort to the upcoming Zach Braff film Wish I Was Here and today Line of Best Fit points out the song “Heavenly Father” has officially debuted. In terms of sound, it owes at least a bit of rent to Repave closer “Almanac” which was similarly constructed around an electronic figure. That said, the synthesizer in “Almanac” was far more confident and forward-moving than the electro manipulation we hear in “Heavenly Father”. The piece hiccups and stutters in shifted pitches as Vernon’s familiar ache floats atop. At times invading hi-hats tics make you think “Heavenly Father” could launch into trap territory if given enough time. But the song doesn’t have that kind of certainty. Vernon’s perpetually wondering if he can ever come to accept a higher power, or so it seems. “I was never sure how much of you I could let in,” could be a religious skeptic’s call to the Lord or an explanation offered to a former love why things didn’t work out. (You can listen to “Heavenly Father” now through the All Songs Considered Media Player on NPR and look for the Wish I Was Here soundtrack to drop digitally July 15.)