Until We Meet Again: Farewell to the Record Bar

Saturday, January 2, 2016 marked the final show at the Record Bar as we currently know it.  On this night the honors of sending her off two local groups: Your Friend, Making Movies.  It was a sold out show with every inch of the bar filled to the gills with fans and patrons from over the years having one last go in the venue.

Record Bar has a special place for me because I had a lot of firsts there.  It was the first place we played our Morphine cover set with Found a Job when it was still Molly Picture Club.  RB was where we saw the Members of Morphine bring those same songs back to life and carry on the spirit of Mark Sandman.

The Record Bar was where we stood in the freezing cold on a Wednesday night to see Daptone artists the Budos Band blow the doors off with two hours of incredible funk/afro-beat.  We made so many friends, met so many musicians and forged many bonds. We saw quite literally hundreds of local artists grace the stage to share their talents with us.

It’s hard to think the place is gone at least in its current form.  For years it served as a hub for us.  The staff treated us generously and always friendly.

We were recently at the Holy Cow Market for a party and there leaned against a wall was “the sign”.  It was dirty and faded, parts of the mounting hardware lay nearby.  You could see the faded paint underneath where the original logo had been.  Standing there, looking at it was like staring at a ghost.  You knew what you were looking at, but you didn’t couldn’t equate it in your brain.  It was surreal.  People passed by and looked at it like they were at a memorial service, quietly whispering to one another.

Leaving the market that night, looking at the sign one last time, was difficult to put into words.  I had the feeling that I don’t get often.  It was a feeling I’d rather not have.

The Record Bar is gone, hopefully just for now.  But it will always represent a community of people that we hope to call life-long friends.  Until we meet again, farewell Record Bar.

Your Friend

 

 

Click for more of Your Friend

Making Movies

AUDIO from Making Movies’ set

 

 

 

 

 

Click for more of Making Movies

Border Wars II: The Architects, Big Iron, The Racketees at Record Bar

Back on the first Friday of December, a lineup feature some of the loudest and heaviest rock and punk bands in the area stormed the Record Bar.  Featuring Kansas City staples the Architects, Big Iron and the Racketees, it was loud and fast from the beginning to the end.

Check out some audio from the show and images below:

The Racketees

Click for more Racketees images

Big Iron

Click for more Big Iron images

Pre-Thanksgiving at the Tank Room

The eve of Christmas featured a lineup of bands at the Tank Room.  We managed to catch Yes You Are, The Fairweather and Not a Planet.  Check out some images from the show and audio from Not a Planet’s set:

Yes You Are

 

 

 

 

Click for more of Yes You Are

The Fairweather

 

 

 

Click for more Fairweather

 

Not a Planet

 

The Quivers at Harling’s Upstairs

Caught the Quivers set a couple weeks back at Harling’s Upstairs. They debuted several new tunes at the show and as soon as I get song titles I’ll have those up for your listening pleasure. In the meantime check out “Keep Your Socks On” and the images below!
Listen to – The Quivers – Keep Your Sock…

 

 

 

 

The Quivers photo album here.

Making Movies and Allyu at Record Bar on Valentine’s Day

On Valentine’s day at Record Bar, Making Movies performed to a sold out crowd featuring songs spanning the band’s entire catalog. The set featured two new tracks and a couple covers in addition to Making Movies originals.  Recently returning from a six-week long stint on the west coast, the band debuted new material and joined openers Allyu, a latin folk ensemble, during the opening set.  Allyu would join Making Movies during their set to perform an acoustic number.

Here’s audio, video and images of the show:

Click for more Making Movies and Allyu

 

Audio from the show is here.

 

 

 

For more local music news and events head over to KC Live Music Blog!

“Tambourine Light”- Woods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Titling the A-side from an upcoming 7″ single “Tambourine Light” couldn’t have been a mistake by psych-folk rockers Woods. Before lead singer Jeremy Earl’s voice can begin, his shimmering guitar riff engenders comparisons to The Byrds’ epochal cover of “Mr. Tambourine Man”. It’s not just Earl and his guitar tone; everyone in Woods manages to summon the spirit of the folk-rock originators. Kevin Morby’s barely there, but anchoring bass doesn’t fall far from the Chris Hillman tree. The way Aaron Neveu plays his lilting drummer pattern, Michael Clarke may as well be manning the kit. Even Woods’ soft harmonizing exists on the same spectrum as the Roger McGuinn-led group In the “jingle-jangle morning” it’s clear who Woods are following.

There are digressions though. Earl’s voice is best described as “quietly aching,” whereas McGuinn’s is routinely labelled “nasal” or “drawling.” And while that’s a miniscule difference, it’s an important one. McGuinn sometimes sounded disappointed singing through those nostrils, but you got the sense he’d move past it. With Earl, it’s harder to tell. Sure he’s looking up “past the Sun,” but at what and for how long? “Forever” is a word he let’s go of as the band gels into a restful groove. That said it’s an eternity where the bliss of it being “forever morning” can easily be misconstrued as “forever mourning.” In that period of time he’s pushed creeping shadows away and has felt all sorts of challenges come up “against him.” Hearing Earl describe these struggles you realize if anyone’s ready “for to fade,” it’s him.
(“Tambourine Light” will be out July 8 on Captured Tracks and is backed by “Tomorrow’s Only Yesterday”. You can hear the track here now.)

 

 

“Get By Get High”- Feathered Rhino

There’s little in the music of “Get By Get High” to support such a “psychedelic” title. On the opening track from Minneapolis folk-artist Feathered Rhino’s self-titled EP, an unnervingly ragged guitar figure emerges and lingers throughout. It doesn’t sound: detuned, out of tune, or off key, no it sounds like it’s on its last leg, like it will collapse at any second. If there’s any sort of psychedelic, it’s hidden in that haunting declaration.

And considering the weight Joseph Wilcox is putting on an already rickety frame, you’d forgive it for collapsing. Immediately Wilcox is croaking “by myself,” as though he’s been lonely for so long now all he can do is genuflect on his own isolation. What started as an attempt to “find my way” has turned into a slog to find any sort of connection. You can hear the desperation in that aforementioned croak, which winds through the rafters of an abandoned barn. At some point it gives up altogether and drifts off to sleep, where an unnamed affection’s “eyes are in my dreams at night,” as Wilcox puts it. Hidden in that haunting declaration is a tinge of psychedelia. Nothing lysergic or mind-expanding, instead the sort where you’re transfixed on a singular object. Time slows to a halt. Heavy-breathing kicks-in. The “high” shifts from physical to spiritual.

Feathered Rhino is available now on Bandcamp, courtesy of local label Petrified Records.